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Rare 17th-century map of Australia resurfaces


Posted on Tuesday, 7 November, 2017 | Comment icon 13 comments

The map is missing much of Australia's east coast. Image Credit: National Library of Australia
The incredibly rare map, of which only a few are known to exist, has reappeared after 350 years.
The map is a printed copy of 'Archipelagus Orientalis' which was created by Dutch cartographer Joan Blaeu in the 17th century before Europeans had fully explored the continent.

Considered to be the most important European map of Australia before the arrival of the British, the map is missing much of Australia's east coast but does include the earliest known details of the sighting of Tasmania by the seafarer Abel Tasman who visited the island in 1642.

Incredibly, the map, which measures around five feet in width, turned up recently in a storage facility in Stockholm in the estate of an antiquarian bookseller where it had sat for several decades.

"The fact it survived at all is remarkable, and probably owes much to the fact no one knew it existed for about a century," said Ryan Stokes, chair of the National Library of Australia Council.

The map has now gone on display at the National Library's headquarters in Canberra until mid-2018.


Source: Live Science | Comments (13)

Tags: Australia, Map

Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #4 Posted by paperdyer on 7 November, 2017, 20:45
I think part of it is that maps were an art form and more appreciated than current maps which are a dime a dozen.
Comment icon #5 Posted by _KB_ on 8 November, 2017, 6:39
... ever wonder what a kangaroo tastes like...
Comment icon #6 Posted by third_eye on 8 November, 2017, 9:16
Like Captain was first told ... kangaroo ... ~
Comment icon #7 Posted by _KB_ on 8 November, 2017, 9:38
strange i always thought that it meant "i don't understand" rather than "i don't know", you learn something new every day, nice answer by the way
Comment icon #8 Posted by third_eye on 8 November, 2017, 10:00
Updated along the way I guess, from my days as a kid it was 'I don't know' thanks ... welcome aboard by the way ... ~
Comment icon #9 Posted by _KB_ on 8 November, 2017, 11:31
glad to be here!
Comment icon #10 Posted by jesspy on 10 November, 2017, 11:39
To me it was kind of sweetish and rich. Not sure if that is because of the way it is cooked. I had roo skewers cooked over an open flame. There are 3.5 million of them about to be hunted down we should export the meat out.
Comment icon #11 Posted by aztek on 10 November, 2017, 20:12
my friend's parents†live in Australia she goes there every few years, she brought me kangaroo jerky once , it was softer than beef jerky, tasted sweeter, not as dry, but smell was unpleasant a bit. no it was not spoiled.
Comment icon #12 Posted by Peter B on 11 November, 2017, 5:21
Sorry to ruin a good story (which I'd also heard) but apparently the word kangaroo comes from a local indigenous word for...drumroll...the kangaroo! From Wikipedia: The word "kangaroo" derives from the Guugu Yimthirr word gangurru, referring to grey kangaroos.
Comment icon #13 Posted by third_eye on 11 November, 2017, 7:31
Let's not start burning outdated Educational Ministry Approved Syllabus publications (Cambridge if I remember correctly) in a merry olde bonfire now†shall we ? I grew up reading hand me downs from Aunts and Uncles who studied overseas, funny thing is if I'm not wrong. my Uncle did his University stint in Germany while the Aunts were somewhere North of London ... ~


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