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Boeing unveils stingray-shaped military drone

Posted on Sunday, 31 December, 2017 | Comment icon 6 comments

Drones have become a major part of US military operations. Image Credit: Boeing
The state-of-the-art MQ-25 drone has been designed to provide the US Navy with refueling capabilities.
Drone technology has become so sophisticated over the last few years that these unmanned aerial vehicles are now an integral part of most modern militaries.

This latest model from Boeing has been designed for the US Navy and is able to not only land on an aircraft carrier out at sea but can also refuel and extend the range of other aircraft such as the Boeing F/A-18 Super Hornet, Boeing EA-18G Growler and Lockheed Martin F-35C fighter.

Boeing is currently competing with General Atomics and Lockheed Martin to win a contract to build as many as 76 aerial drones that will become operational sometime in the mid 2020s.

While it is unclear exactly how much the new contract is worth, a previous contract, which sought drones for both refuelling and strike capabilities, was thought to be worth $3 billion.

The new drones, by contrast, are not going to be equipped with the ability to strike targets but will instead focus on offering conventional aircraft the means with which to strike over larger distances.

"The Navy has a growing concern with threats to its aircraft carriers," said defense consultant Loren Thompson. "Carriers cost billions of dollars and have thousands of personnel on board, so if it can attack targets without having to get too close, that's a big warfighter advantage."

Source: Washington Post | Comments (6)

Tags: Drone, Boeing

Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #1 Posted by FateAmeniableToChange on 31 December, 2017, 18:36
If you had this in your gun and infrared sights, blurred it a bit, it wouldnt look that dissimilar to the Nimitz footage imo
Comment icon #2 Posted by pallidin on 31 December, 2017, 22:22
Looks like drones are increasingly on the minds of military planners, foreign and domestic. Perhaps even terrorists. The recent technological innovation of "drone flying" is both exciting and scary. I have a "toy quad-copter" and it sure is fun. I also recognize the entire potential.
Comment icon #3 Posted by FateAmeniableToChange on 31 December, 2017, 23:25
The potential is crazy!! Right now there are patents filed for organic vat grown drones! Fling in AI and another few existing techs or patents like 24hr flight and FRC (Facial Recognition Cameras) a weapon = Apocalypse!! Hypothetically
Comment icon #4 Posted by Captain Risky on 1 January, 2018, 1:52
a prelude to complete military automation. 
Comment icon #5 Posted by dragon1440 on 1 January, 2018, 2:07
So am I understanding right they can do mid air refuel?,I can see it now.... Hijackers could easily take over then. Many of hijacking have been thwartex when plane had to refuel.
Comment icon #6 Posted by goodgodno on 2 January, 2018, 17:53
Well this could land on a US carrier at least, which is fine because this is designed for the US navy which has the intelligence to stick with catapults.  On the other hand, our Royal Navy has decided to go for F35b’s and a silly ramp, as a catapult system is too expensive for a £3 billion pound carrier. I know this is kind of unrelated but I’ll have a rant about this issue given half the opportunity. oh yeah, nice work Boeing 

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