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Ghosts & Hauntings

Canberra man falls victim to 'curse of Uluru'

By T.K. Randall
May 25, 2018 · Comment icon 61 comments



Is there really a curse of Uluru ? Image Credit: CC BY-SA 3.0 CSIRO
A man who took home a piece of Australia's famous Ayers Rock believes that he has fallen under its curse.
When Steve Hill visited the landmark during a solo trip to Australia's spiritual heartland last year, he didn't think anything of picking up a small chunk of it to take home as a souvenir.

"While walking around the base of Uluru (Ayers Rock), I saw this rock and just had to have it," he said. "Google maps indicated I was at the old campground where Azaria Chamberlain went missing, so I thought I'd take a small rock as memorabilia, you know, to put on the mantelpiece back at home."

Before long however, he started to experience a spate of unfortunate incidents that would lead him to believe that stories of a curse befalling anyone who disturbs Uluru might actually be true.

Things started to go awry even during his return trip. On one otherwise unremarkable stretch of road, kangaroos started inexplicably hurling themselves at his vehicle, as if deliberately.
"I've driven extensively through the outback and never seen such behavior from kangaroos," he said. "It was at that point I started to think maybe I shouldn't have taken the rock and that maybe I'd fallen victim to the curse."

A couple of months later, his engine failed and mechanics struggled to figure out what was wrong.

Even during his day-to-day activities Hill reported feeling nervous, and when all the photographs of his trip to the rock mysteriously disappeared off his phone, he decided that enough was enough.

"I've been planning a trip to Cape York for some time, but have decided to not only bring it forward to next month, but also make a 3000-kilometre detour via Uluru," he said.

"I'm going to return the rock; it's just something I've got to do. I know exactly where I took it from, so as soon as I get to Uluru, I'll be returning it."

Source: Canberra Times | Comments (61)


Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #52 Posted by Still Waters 4 years ago
Oh for goodness sake, all this nit-picking over a name! Ayers Rock, Uluru, it doesn't matter which name it goes by. Enough please.
Comment icon #53 Posted by DingoLingo 4 years ago
well me and Chrlz know it because .. well.. we are australian *laughing* your talking about our country mate.. I'm a born and bred west aussie
Comment icon #54 Posted by Vlad the Mighty 4 years ago
I see you corrected yourself, so I withdraw the pedantry 
Comment icon #55 Posted by DerDesertRat 4 years ago
I have a piece of Uluru, Hawaiian Volcanoes, Rock of Gibraltar, AND a piece of the Great Pyramid in my rock garden. Also have numerous burial/grave goods from North American first nations sites on private property or from prior to the archaeological act passed in the 70's. And I have fantastic luck. No kidding. I constantly get comments about it. How did yiu get tickets to the sold out show, how many royal flushes can one person possibly draw? How many near miss Chupacabra/Sasquatch attcks.have you survived (probably dozens - but I didn't even know it). Near misses in shootouts I could go on a... [More]
Comment icon #56 Posted by openozy 4 years ago
You won't be having good luck if the aboriginals find out you have a chunk of Uluru.
Comment icon #57 Posted by Piney 4 years ago
 You sound like a person who is full of respect for indigenous cultures.........
Comment icon #58 Posted by moonman 4 years ago
Not sure if serious...
Comment icon #59 Posted by Black Red Devil 4 years ago
His problems started way before visiting Uluru.  Living in Canberra is enough of a curse.  Too cold, too many politicians and not enough ocean.
Comment icon #60 Posted by Mr Walker 4 years ago
Of course, to a great extent, EVERYTHING is just in our heads,  because  humans are mind more than body. 
Comment icon #61 Posted by Mr Walker 4 years ago
Uluru/ Ayres rock are both official names for the rock. It was the first landmark given official dual names in Dec 1993, from memory. What an Australian calls it is up to their own sense of political correctness, although there has been some govt and community consensus to call it Uluru. as a cultural  recognition of its importance to our native peoples. It still ignites passions, especially with new moves to ban climbing on it.   I climbed it early  one morning back in 1973, before any controversy arose. It was Jan and the temps during the day were in the 40s  C  so we set off early, a t dawn... [More]


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