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Soyuz astronauts make emergency landing


Posted on Thursday, 11 October, 2018 | Comment icon 57 comments

Alexey Ovchinin and Nick Hague before the launch. Image Credit: CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 NASA
Two astronauts narrowly escaped disaster today when their Soyuz rocket developed a problem with its booster.
Russian Cosmonaut Alexey Ovchinin and US astronaut Nick Hague had been heading up to the International Space Station from a launch site in Kazakhstan when the incident occurred.

"The Soyuz capsule is returning to Earth via a ballistic descent, which is a sharper angle of landing compared to normal," NASA wrote as events unfolded. "Search and rescue teams are heading towards the expected touchdown location of the spacecraft and crew. "

Fortunately the capsule managed to land safely in a remote region of Kazakhstan and contact has since been made with the two crew members who have reported that they are unharmed.

It isn't clear exactly what went wrong with the booster during launch and it is likely that an extensive investigation will have to be carried out before any more launches can be attempted.

This means that the ISS will be stuck with only three crew members for the foreseeable future.

The last time a Soyuz made an emergency landing was all the way back in 1975.

Source: BBC News | Comments (57)

Tags: Soyuz, Rocket

Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #48 Posted by seanjo on 12 October, 2018, 20:27
I'm guessing from the information in this vid, water ingress, freezing and jamming the valve.  
Comment icon #49 Posted by Waspie_Dwarf on 13 October, 2018, 8:39
1.We have a situation where both agencies are run by career politicians. I suspect that they are just reflecting the rhetoric that is occurring between the nations for the time being. The reality is that NASA and Roscosmos continue to need each other for now, so they will continue to cooperate. 2. Crew Dragon (and Boeing's Starliner) will not be ready in time to make any real difference. Both need an unmanned test flight before they can be certified to fly crew. These test flights have been pushed back to early 2019. SpaceX are also scheduled to have a Max-Q abort test of the Crew Dragon befor... [More]
Comment icon #50 Posted by bmk1245 on 13 October, 2018, 13:04
Well, NASA needs (for a while) Roskosmos, but Roskosmos, managed by "effective manager" Rogozin, needs NASA waaaay more. Shut those ties, and it will be the end of Roskosmos.
Comment icon #51 Posted by Waspie_Dwarf on 13 October, 2018, 22:29
Not true. The ISS is constructed in such a way that it requires both sides to operate it. Electrical power is provided by the US side, propulsion to keep the ISS in orbit is provided by the Russian side. If one agency walks away the other can no longer operate the ISS, If Russia abondons the ISS those nice new, shiny spacecraft that Boeing and SpaceX are building for NASA will have no where to go. Roscosmos, on the other hand, are in partnership with China (as are ESA). When China launches it's space station their is a good chance that it will be visited by Russian cosmonauts, launched from Ru... [More]
Comment icon #52 Posted by bmk1245 on 14 October, 2018, 10:50
ISS is just one bit of Roskosmos' income. Cut all ties (and in technology sense), and russkie space industry will meet its end.
Comment icon #53 Posted by Waspie_Dwarf on 5 November, 2018, 22:49
How so? The Russian space survived pretty well before the ISS. It does not, and never has, relied on the USA (although it is true that the ISS was certainly helpful when the Russian space programme was poorly funded back in the early days of the cooperation). Roscosmos has cooperative agreements with ESA, China, JAXA and the UAE space agency. Like NASA the ISS is not the only  programme it is involved with. The premature ending of the ISS would certainly hurt Roscosmos, as it would NASA, JAXA and ESA, but it would not end the Russian space programme.
Comment icon #54 Posted by Waspie_Dwarf on 5 November, 2018, 23:10
Crewed Soyuz flights set to resume after Russia blames close call on final-assembly error  
Comment icon #55 Posted by bmk1245 on 10 November, 2018, 11:39
Well, maybe not the end in the sense of full end, but stagnation and decline. And its not just about ISS. New technologies may fall under US sanctions on dual-purpose goods, and that can hurt Roscosmos in big way. BTW, kazakhs, one of the best allies of Russia, chose SpaceX to launch their satellites. Thats freakin' wake-up call/bucket of cold water for russkies.
Comment icon #56 Posted by toast on 10 November, 2018, 19:52
On that single flight, the Falcon9 will carry 70 (seven-zero) satellite into orbit so SpaceX was able to offer a price thats ways below competing companies tariffs. Thats the modus operandi of Elon: reduce costs by big payload volume per unit/lift-up and by the use of reusable carriers = reduce costs for the clients.
Comment icon #57 Posted by bmk1245 on 11 November, 2018, 11:52
Yeah, I know that. Anyway, few years ago russkies laughed at Musks idea of reusable rockets, nowadays they are claiming that was their idea OT, famed equation "derived" by Tsiolkovsky, was derived by William Moore and William Leich waaay before Tsiolkovsky.


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