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Bacteria species lives off caffeine

Posted on Saturday, 28 May, 2011 | Comment icon 9 comments | News tip by: Persia


Image credit: sxc.hu

 
Scientists have discovered a new species of bacteria that actually depends on caffeine for survival.

Known as Pseudomonas putida the microbe uses enzymes to break down the caffeine in to carbon dioxide and ammonia. It is hoped the discovery could assist in the development of new treatments for a number of different diseases.

"A newly described species of bacteria has joined the ranks of those of us who depend on caffeine for survival."

  View: Full article

 Source: Popular Science


  Discuss: View comments (9)

   


 
Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #1 Posted by DelCarbon on 28 May, 2011, 12:51
Also known as, ''Americans''.
Comment icon #2 Posted by 27vet on 28 May, 2011, 14:14
Starbuckites?
Comment icon #3 Posted by Emin on 28 May, 2011, 20:39
this is why coffee goes bad if not refrigerated
Comment icon #4 Posted by ShadowSot on 28 May, 2011, 20:51
Not! It steals our precious! Also known as, ''Americans''. Hey! I... we... nevermind...
Comment icon #5 Posted by xXHellkittiesXx on 28 May, 2011, 21:31
I'm a bacteria that lives off of caffeine.
Comment icon #6 Posted by Taut on 30 May, 2011, 1:03
Also known as, ''Americans''. You took the words right out of my mouth!! LMAO! I was gonna say humans.
Comment icon #7 Posted by SilverOctavia on 9 June, 2011, 15:47
Coffee goes bad if not refrigerated? Really?
Comment icon #8 Posted by crystal sage on 10 June, 2011, 0:03
I wonder if it is that bacteria in our system that causes caffeine cravings??? Or the caffeine withdrawal headache...? Researchers found P. putida living in a flower bed at the University of Iowa. Do gardeners have greater caffeine cravings...??? Bacteria ‘drunk on coffee’ could pave way for universal disease cures! http://www.indianexpress.com/news/bacteria-drunk-on-coffee-could-pave-way-for-universal-disease-cures/800936/ Scientists at University of Iowa have identified four different bacteria that can survive by consuming caffeine, one of them being Pseudomonas putida CBB5. The scientists b... [More]
Comment icon #9 Posted by crystal sage on 10 June, 2011, 0:38
Interesting too that this bacteria seems to be drug resistant... as shown in some research of peritonitus... and tonsilitus http://www.waset.org/journals/ijabs/v1/v1-1-4.pdf Peritonitis due to Pseudomonas putida in a Patient Receiving Automated The aim of the study is to identify the molecular mechanism of the multidrug resistant P. putida among the isolates. total of twenty tensile biopsies were collected from children undergoing tonsillectomy from teaching hospital ENT department and Kurdistan private hospital in sulaimani city. All biopsies were homogenized and cultured; the obtained bacter... [More]


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