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Dolphin whistles translated in real-time


Posted on Wednesday, 2 April, 2014 | Comment icon 17 comments

Can we ever hope to understand dolphins ? Image Credit: CC BY-SA 2.0 Vince Smith
Researchers have succeeded in directly translating a specific word from a dolphin for the first time.
Dolphins are considered to be one of the most intelligent species on the planet, yet interpreting their mysterious vocalizations is a goal that has continued to stump researchers for years.

To tackle this problem, scientists at the Wild Dolphin Project (WDP) have been developing a special translation device called "Cetacean Hearing and Telemetry" that can pick up and analyze some of the sounds that dolphins make.

The first major success for the device came when WDP director Denise Herzing was able to translate a single word from a dolphin in the Caribbean. The dolphins had been trained beforehand to associate certain whistles with different objects and in this case a dolphin was recorded using the whistle for "sargassum" which is a type of seaweed that the animals commonly eat.

The breakthrough suggests for the first time that understanding dolphins is not outside the realm of possibility and that we may be able to eventually figure out just how intelligent they actually are.

Source: Cnet.com.au | Comments (17)

Tags: Dolphin


 
Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #8 Posted by YukiEsmaElite0 on 2 April, 2014, 17:01
Them dolphins are getting too smart for their own good.... *^*
Comment icon #9 Posted by Taun on 2 April, 2014, 18:40
I wonder how long before politicians start trying to give them the vote...
Comment icon #10 Posted by theotherguy on 2 April, 2014, 20:42
Meanwhile, under the water... Researchers have succeeded in directly translating a specific word from a human for the first time. Humans are considered to be one of the most intelligent species on the planet, yet interpreting their mysterious vocalizations is a goal that has continued to stump researchers for years. To tackle this problem, scientists at the Wild Human Project (WHP) have been developing a special translation device called "Dirt-Based Hearing and Telemetry" that can pick up and analyze some of the sounds that humans make. The first major success for the device came when WHP dire... [More]
Comment icon #11 Posted by Xanthurion2 on 2 April, 2014, 22:06
Cool.
Comment icon #12 Posted by calaf on 2 April, 2014, 23:46
How wonderful it would be if we could talk to dollphins! I'd be happy if I could talk to the foreign call center operators.
Comment icon #13 Posted by Sundew on 3 April, 2014, 15:16
Sargassum, huh? I would have guessed "fish." If they ever say, "So long and thanks for all the fish," uh, oh.
Comment icon #14 Posted by LimeGelatin on 10 April, 2014, 16:28
I completely guarantee to you that a human can tell you exactly what a dolphin is saying when it makes a certain sound, and that all of the dolphins in the world speak exactly the same dialect...-LoLzzz
Comment icon #15 Posted by third_eye on 10 April, 2014, 16:34
I wonder if they knows anything about where Atlantis really is ....
Comment icon #16 Posted by coldethyl on 12 April, 2014, 2:57
That would be brilliant to talk to dolphins. I'd never get the pronunciation right.
Comment icon #17 Posted by RhiannonB77 on 18 April, 2014, 1:12
LOVE LOVE LOVE dolphins!!!!!!!!


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