Tuesday, May 23, 2017
Contact us    |    Advertise    |   Help   RSS icon Twitter icon Facebook icon
    Home  ·  News  ·  Forum  ·  Stories  ·  Image Gallery  ·  Columns  ·  Encyclopedia  ·  Videos
Find: in
This news story is archived which means that, while it is still available to view, the information contained within may be outdated and the original source site/link may no longer be viewable.

For the most recent stories, please visit either the site's home page or main news section.

New invisibility cloak can 'freeze time'

Posted on Monday, 19 August, 2013 | Comment icon 8 comments | News tip by: Still Waters


Image credit: CC 2.0 Matt Buck

 
A cloak made from mirrors is able to make it appear to an observer that the subject is frozen in time.

While the conventional idea of an invisibility cloak is a device or garment that renders the subject invisible, researchers at Northwestern University have come up with a new type of cloak made from mirrors that can put time on hold for any objects inside it. A clock for example would continue to operate normally but to the external observer it would appear to have stopped.

The 'temporal cloak' currently only exists on the drawing board but according to scientists there is nothing to stop it being built using materials available today. The advantage of being able to hide something in this way could prove invaluable in a number of applications including on the battlefield, making this of prime interest to military technology specialists.

"Researchers at Northwestern University have designed an invisibility cloak that can temporally hide objects for an indefinite period of time."

  View: Full article

 Source: Extreme Tech


  Discuss: View comments (8)

   


 
Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #1 Posted by pallidin on 19 August, 2013, 3:01
The title extension is misleading, not by the OP here, but by the article writer. The "can stop time indefinetly" is not true at all. In fact, this appears to be a very complex process that, not only is just theorectical(though likely) but has significant limitations. For example, the article states: The duration of the temporal cloak is twice the time it takes light to travel between A and B — and so if you place B a very, very long way away — such as on another planet — you could theoretically cloak an object for minutes, or hours… or light years. I guess you could even do it here on Earth, ... [More]
Comment icon #2 Posted by wyelander on 19 August, 2013, 11:06
I built an invisibility cloak a couple of years ago. Trouble is I've not been able to find it since...
Comment icon #3 Posted by Mac E on 19 August, 2013, 12:19
This is another invisibility cloak with major limitations making it relatively useless for practical applications.
Comment icon #4 Posted by ash68 on 19 August, 2013, 15:55
Many great inventions we take for granted today started out pretty useless with limitations so I think you have to appreciate this as a first step towards something great
Comment icon #5 Posted by paperdyer on 19 August, 2013, 17:38
Even in Star Trek, if you looked hard, you could see the spacial distortions from a Romulan or Klingon cloak.
Comment icon #6 Posted by StarMountainKid on 20 August, 2013, 3:59
I witnessed a real invisibility cloak in Chicago years ago. I was at a St. Patrick's Day parade. What it was was a garbage truck covered with mirrors. It was really a strange sight...or not a sight. The truck couldn't be seen at all, all there was to see were the reflections of the buildings around the truck. The truck was invisible. If you had seen it in person, it was weird. Another kind of invisibility cloak was tried in WW2 to hide war ships at sea. The U.S. Navy Dept. asked some scientist how to do this. His reply was to put bright lights on the ship in daytime. The Admirals thought this ... [More]
Comment icon #7 Posted by shrooma on 20 August, 2013, 7:24
Another kind of invisibility cloak was tried in WW2 to hide war ships at sea. The U.S. Navy Dept. asked some scientist how to do this. His reply was to put bright lights on the ship in daytime. The Admirals thought this was a crazy idea, but when they tried it, bright lights a ship near the horizon made it impossible to see. . sounds more plausable than the 'Philidelphia Experiment' SMK!
Comment icon #8 Posted by brlesq1 on 20 August, 2013, 9:17
Hey, this is pretty cool. Don't know what you'd use it for, but it's still pretty cool.


Please Login or Register to post a comment.


  On the forums
Forum posts:
Forum topics:
Members:

5909819
254276
167281

 
UFO dossier may be released after UK election
5-22-2017
A selection of previously withheld documents about UFOs could be seeing a release in the near future.
Who was Leonardo da Vinci's mystery mother?
5-22-2017
An Oxford University professor believes he may have pieced together the identity of Leonardo's mother.
Astronauts to undertake emergency spacewalk
5-22-2017
The two-hour spacewalk, which is set to take place on Tuesday, will aim to repair a broken data relay box.
Man finds Viking treasure with metal detector
5-21-2017
Derek McLennan earned almost $2.6 million after unearthing a horde of 10th-century Viking artefacts.
Other news in this category
Mount Everest's 'Hillary Step' is destroyed
Posted 5-21-2017 | 5 comments
The infamous rocky outcrop was the last great challenge for mountaineers aiming to reach the summit....
 
Doomsday vault flooded by melting permafrost
Posted 5-20-2017 | 22 comments
Norway's Svalbard Global Seed Vault has been breached by water flooding in through the entrance....
 
Huge 20-meter 'rogue waves' are actually real
Posted 5-13-2017 | 9 comments
Recent research has shown that massive waves can appear out of the blue with surprising regularity....
 
Ambitious UK firm wants to build the Matrix
Posted 5-12-2017 | 15 comments
Improbable is the latest startup hoping to change the world by embracing virtual reality technology....
 
Earliest known recording of JFK revealed
Posted 5-11-2017 | 3 comments
The recording, which was made when Kennedy was 20, has been released by archivists at Harvard University....
 
Graphene could 'revolutionize nuclear power'
Posted 5-9-2017 | 9 comments
Scientists in Manchester have revealed that graphene can make heavy water production more efficient....
 
DARPA investigating fast learning methods
Posted 5-8-2017 | 6 comments
Researchers at DARPA want to make it possible for a soldier to be trained in a fraction of the time....
 
'Thor' drills down 4.7km beneath Iceland
Posted 5-6-2017 | 0 comments
A new experimental project is aiming to generate electricity by harnessing the power of volcanoes....
 
Abu Dhabi firm wants to tow iceberg to the UAE
Posted 5-6-2017 | 17 comments
An impending water shortage in the United Arab Emirates has called for a rather extraordinary solution....
 

 View: More news in this category
 
Top   |  Home   |   Forum   |   News   |   Image Gallery   |  Columns   |   Encyclopedia   |   Videos   |   Polls
UM-X 10.7 Unexplained-Mysteries.com © 2001-2017
Privacy Policy and Disclaimer   |   Cookies   |   Advertise   |   Contact   |   Help/FAQ