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Palaeontology

Pygmy Tyrannosaurus rex discovered

March 14, 2014 | Comment icon 6 comments



A Tyrannosaurus rex skull. Image Credit: CC BY-SA 3.0 David Monniaux
A new smaller breed of the world's best known dinosaur is thought to have once roamed the Arctic.
Dating back 70 million years, this new pygmy tyrannosaur is smaller but otherwise extremely similar to its larger sub-tropic counterpart. Palaeontologists had initially believed that a specimen unearthed in 2006 was simply a juvenile until further research later revealed that it was in fact a fully matured adult of a different species.

While the regular Tyrannosaurus rex can grow up to 40ft in length and weigh 4 tons, this new smaller species, known as Nanuqsaurus hoglundi, measures only 25ft and weighs 1,000lbs.
"The 'pygmy tyrannosaur' alone is really cool because it tells us something about what the environment was like in the ancient Arctic," said study co-author Anthony Fiorillo.

"But what makes this discovery even more exciting is that Nanuqsaurus hoglundi also tells us about the biological richness of the ancient polar world during a time when the Earth was very warm compared to today."

Source: The Register | Comments (6)


Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #1 Posted by Eldorado 9 years ago
Is it just me or are there an awful lot of previously unknown species being discovered these days? (in the last few years)
Comment icon #2 Posted by TheSpoonyOne 9 years ago
Hope it's not another case of... ^
Comment icon #3 Posted by spud the mackem 9 years ago
Is it just me or are there an awful lot of previously unknown species being discovered these days? (in the last few years) Pop along to Celtic Park and you can see loads of lizards (some fossilised) you can even dig up the pitch if no one is looking, hehe.
Comment icon #4 Posted by taniwha 9 years ago
Hope it's not another case of... ^ At first it was thought that the find was a juvenile T-Rex, but the bone formation indicated that the dinosaur was fully mature at the time of its death. So no. Interesting video though
Comment icon #5 Posted by Sundew 9 years ago
Nanuqsaurus hoglundi, as in "Nanook of the North" the 1922 movie about an Inuit family? People seem to have a lot of fun with the binomial naming system. Carl Linnaeus himself used to name plants after genitalia (for example: Clitoria, Amorphophallus) to shock the prudish of his day.
Comment icon #6 Posted by coolguy 9 years ago
Awseome they should call it little Rex lol.


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