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Nature & Environment

Viral video shows jaguar feeding underwater

By T.K. Randall
May 7, 2015 · Comment icon 18 comments



The big cat was remarkably adept in the water. Image Credit: YouTube / Vince Pinto
Despite cats having a reputation for disliking water the jaguar actually feels very much at home in it.
The third largest feline species after tigers and lions, jaguars are native to the Americas and can be found as far north as the United States and as far south as Argentina.

Well known for possessing an extremely powerful bite, these huge cats are solitary predators that utilize stalk-and-ambush tactics to catch and kill their prey. What isn't quite as well known however is their remarkable aquatic prowess - jaguars are capable swimmers that can dive and spend extended periods of time underwater.

Now though thanks to a new viral video uploaded on to YouTube by user Vince Pinto this little-known skill has become something of a social media sensation.
The footage, which has already received several million hits, shows a jaguar at a zoo gliding through the water with ease as it grabs and eats its food off the bottom of a tank.

"I had no idea that a Jaguar could remain underwater for so long," Pinto wrote.

This is certainly one cat that isn't afraid to go in the water.



Source: AOL | Comments (18)


Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #9 Posted by DefenceMinisterMishkin 7 years ago
ALL cats hate water
Comment icon #10 Posted by Foil Hat Ninja 7 years ago
Have you ever tried to give a cat a bath? It's hilarious and dangerous.
Comment icon #11 Posted by Machala2012 7 years ago
Seems like an Animal that prowls the banks of the amazon river would have to get accustomed to swimming, its a constant source of easy food, and a constant obstacle they would be facing daily. Especially with the rainy season. Not to say that the ones living Further north would be this way but just a thought on how the same species from different areas can have different behaviors. This specific individual is in a zoo, so not really sure, it could just be a result of how it was raised.
Comment icon #12 Posted by DanteHoratio 7 years ago
Both Tigers and Jaguars are known to be good swimmers and that they enjoy being in water, but I never seen one eat something under water. I agree that wild Jaguar likely don't do that, and this one was in a zoo, and was likely raised that way.
Comment icon #13 Posted by moon tide 7 years ago
Amazing. I love the way it'd stop swimming for a while and just float, perfectly at peace under the water. Beautiful creatures. I think the time has arrived to put him back in the jungle.
Comment icon #14 Posted by Rofflaren 7 years ago
Have you ever tried to give a cat a bath? It's hilarious and dangerous. Yes I have two cats and can confirm its dangerous. My girlfriend came up with the incredible bright idea to shower together with one of them a couple of years ago. Afterwards she looked like she had been in a fight with a lawnmower. Some cats (races) do like water as some other posters have already said. But the cat that like water most is the Fishing cat, it even has webbing between its toes to help it swim better. Their main prey is just fish hence the name. The cat attracts fish by lightly tapping the water's surface wi... [More]
Comment icon #15 Posted by Mr. Mummy's Merry Maiden! 7 years ago
Great video...Not something often seen.
Comment icon #16 Posted by Sundew 7 years ago
It's not all that surprising, in parts of their range which include the Amazon basin, the forest itself is flooded for months at a time, even the trees may be underwater. Their prey may use the water to escape; certainly iguanas will do that, and a hungry cat won't let an opportunity go to waste. Jaguars will eat anything they can overpower including aquatic animals like turtles, fish, capybara and so forth. They are by far the most aquatic of the big cats, tigers probably coming in second. They once ranged into parts of the southern U.S. but I don't know of any recent sightings.
Comment icon #17 Posted by DanteHoratio 7 years ago
It's not all that surprising, in parts of their range which include the Amazon basin, the forest itself is flooded for months at a time, even the trees may be underwater. Their prey may use the water to escape; certainly iguanas will do that, and a hungry cat won't let an opportunity go to waste. Jaguars will eat anything they can overpower including aquatic animals like turtles, fish, capybara and so forth. They are by far the most aquatic of the big cats, tigers probably coming in second. They once ranged into parts of the southern U.S. but I don't know of any recent sightings. Well, there h... [More]
Comment icon #18 Posted by thenIsaid 7 years ago
I grew up in southern California and spent time in Baja etc. It was considered common knowledge that jaguars liked water. As Sundew notes, they are rainforest creatures, after all. Those areas are prone to frequent flooding. When I was very young I saw them a couple of times in isolated desert regions as well. They are adaptable and beautiful creatures. Some domesticated housecats also enjoy water. One of mine particularly liked to go outside when it was raining, so he could chase bugs. Another one of my cats didn't particularly make a point of playing in water, but he certainly didn't mind it... [More]


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