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Large Hadron Collider discovers new particle


Posted on Tuesday, 14 July, 2015 | Comment icon 11 comments

One section of the Large Hadron Collider. Image Credit: CC BY-SA 3.0 Julian Herzog
The world's largest atom smasher has made a new discovery in the form of a particle called a pentaquark.
Having only recently relaunched following a two-year hiatus the Large Hadron Collider at Cern has already succeeded in making history once again thanks to the discovery of a new particle.

The bizarrely named pentaquark was first predicted to exist back in the 1960s but had managed to remain elusive for years, much like the Higgs Boson which was finally discovered back in 2012.
A pentaquark is made up of four quarks and an anti-quark, with a quark being a subatomic particle first proposed by physicists Murray Gell Mann and George Zweig in 1964 as the constituent building block of baryons and mesons.

"The pentaquark is not just any new particle," said spokesman Guy Wilkinson. "It represents a way to aggregate quarks, namely the fundamental constituents of ordinary protons and neutrons, in a pattern that has never been observed before in over fifty years of experimental searches."

"Studying its properties may allow us to understand better how ordinary matter, the protons and neutrons from which we're all made, is constituted."

Source: BBC News | Comments (11)


Tags: Large Hadron Collider, Cern, Pentaquark


Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #2 Posted by fred_mc on 14 July, 2015, 16:07
Amazing that theory about matter fits experimental results so well, in this case the found particle was predicted already in the 1960s. It's just a pity that the theory we've got and the experimental results are just about about matter, which makes up less than 5 % of the universe. Over 95 % is dark matter and dark energy, which we have no idea what it is.
Comment icon #3 Posted by pallidin on 14 July, 2015, 16:15
Perhaps I read or interpreted this wrong, but why is the pentaquark considered a new particle? I thought it's constituent quarks are themselves "particles" Would this not be better termed, something like, a new quark-aggregate? Note: I could be very wrong on anything I just said.
Comment icon #4 Posted by Rlyeh on 14 July, 2015, 16:43
Perhaps I read or interpreted this wrong, but why is the pentaquark considered a new particle? I thought it's constituent quarks are themselves "particles" Would this not be better termed, something like, a new quark-aggregate? Note: I could be very wrong on anything I just said. I think it's a composite particle (made up of other particles), while quarks are elementary particles.
Comment icon #5 Posted by pallidin on 14 July, 2015, 16:48
I think it's a composite particle (made up of other particles), while quarks are elementary particles. Ah, thank you...
Comment icon #6 Posted by BeastieRunner on 14 July, 2015, 19:32
Pentaquark is an interesting choice of name.
Comment icon #7 Posted by pallidin on 14 July, 2015, 19:49
Pentaquark is an interesting choice of name. Well, "pentaquark" is so-named because there are 5 (penta means 5) quarks. I guess never seen before in nature. EDIT: Or seen in experimentation before, but predicted to exist. The LHCb experiment confirmed it's existence. What that means to you and I, or to the "world-at-large" I don't know.
Comment icon #8 Posted by BeastieRunner on 14 July, 2015, 22:05
I meant the quark part, not the penta part. Thanks for the lesson, jerk! Just kidding. The article called it a new particle, so to me that implied it being new. Not a variation of an existing one. It's still a new one. My vague comment was more on the semantics than the syntax. ... and it's a personal hang-up of mine.
Comment icon #9 Posted by scaniaman on 14 July, 2015, 22:45
basically, in a pentaquark, matter and antimatter exist together for an extremely short time but destroy each other quickly, hence why they are so rare to find and the LHC has only found 2 pentaquarks.
Comment icon #10 Posted by McFakename on 15 July, 2015, 1:24
Comment icon #11 Posted by Zalmoxis on 16 July, 2015, 1:18
Nuts.


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