Thursday, August 18, 2022
Contact    |    RSS icon Twitter icon Facebook icon  
You are viewing: Home > News > Science & Technology > News story
Welcome Guest ( Login or Register )  

Did you know that you can now support us on Patreon ?

You can subscribe for less than the cost of a cup of coffee - and we'll even throw in a range of exclusive perks as a way to say thank you.
Science & Technology

Polar continent once existed in the Arctic

September 13, 2015 | Comment icon 9 comments



The Arctic was once comprised of a solid land mass. Image Credit: CC 2.0 NASA Goddard
A large land mass was thought to have twice spanned today's Arctic region millions of years ago.
Where today there exists only ice and sea there was once an entire continent - at least that is according to researchers who have revealed the results of a groundbreaking new study which indicates that the Arctic was originally home to a large land mass not once but twice.

The first continent, known as Arctida-1, formed around one billion years ago before eventually breaking up around 750 million years ago. The second, known as Arctida-2, formed somewhere around 250 million years ago at the time of Pangea before breaking up once again.

The land that once made up this continent at the roof of the world can now be found across several different modern-day regions including Franz Josef Land, the continental territories of Chukotka and northern Alaska, the islands of North America and the Spitsbergen Archipelago - among others.

"Analysis of the data showed that in the geological history of the Arctic there were at least two continents, not one as was previously thought," said Professor Dmitry Metelkin.
"According to our model, the first continent, called Arctida-I, was formed one billion years ago. It was a part of a larger supercontinent called Rodinia, which united all known ancient continental blocks."

"The rebirth of Arctida happened at the turn of the Mesozoic period, about 250 million years ago. This is the time in Earth's history when another supercontinent was formed, called Pangea."

It is thought that the discovery could help to support Russia's claim to the Arctic shelf as much of the prehistoric continent is now believed to make up parts of Siberia.

"Today's Arctic attracts close attention, foreign researchers also work in this direction and many are involved in paleomagnetic research," said Professor Metelkin. "Yet I am sure that only we have gathered the paleomagnetic data on the Russian part of the Arctic shelf.

Source: Siberian Times | Comments (9)


Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #1 Posted by robinrenee 7 years ago
That's fascinating stuff, but I don't see why Russian thinks they should have the mineral rights to the Arctic shelf that was attached to Russia a billion years ago. International water is international water. I can see them dividing the Arctic Ocean into big pieces of pie for countries bordering it: U.S., Canada, Greenland, Norway, and Russia.
Comment icon #2 Posted by ROGER 7 years ago
Lots of money involved . http://newcoldwar.org/russia-submits-arctic-claim-to-un-body/
Comment icon #3 Posted by quasar_kid 7 years ago
Where is the photo from? A field trip to the Arctic, or a scientific ship or what?
Comment icon #4 Posted by paperdyer 7 years ago
Since South American used to be attached to Africa, can Africa claim the rights around Brazil past their 12 mile limit? Same logic.
Comment icon #5 Posted by Thorvir Hrothgaard 7 years ago
Ah, those wacky, desperate and stupid Ruskies...
Comment icon #6 Posted by Likely Guy 7 years ago
That's fascinating stuff, but I don't see why Russian thinks they should have the mineral rights to the Arctic shelf that was attached to Russia a billion years ago. International water is international water. I can see them dividing the Arctic Ocean into big pieces of pie for countries bordering it: U.S., Canada, Greenland Denmark, Norway, and Russia. There, fixed that for you. I'd also include Iceland, but maybe that's just me. I've always liked Iceland.
Comment icon #7 Posted by robinrenee 7 years ago
There, fixed that for you. I'd also include Iceland, but maybe that's just me. I've always liked Iceland. i thought about Iceland too when I typed that. But I was thinking about the countries in the arctic circle that probably were also attached to the ancient continents. I guess since Greenland doesn't yet have its independence from Denmark, I go along with the Denmark addition. However, with all the wealth mineral rights might bring to Greenland, they might be pushing for independence.
Comment icon #8 Posted by Frank Merton 7 years ago
If you want to drill in international waters, it would seem sensible to just go ahead and do it. If anyone complains, just say these waters are international, and we are here first.
Comment icon #9 Posted by Noteverythingisaconspiracy 7 years ago
i thought about Iceland too when I typed that. But I was thinking about the countries in the arctic circle that probably were also attached to the ancient continents. I guess since Greenland doesn't yet have its independence from Denmark, I go along with the Denmark addition. However, with all the wealth mineral rights might bring to Greenland, they might be pushing for independence. If we have to be completely anal about it, the right name to use would be the Kingdom of Denmark. Denmark is a country in Europe, but the Kingdom of Denmark is Denmark plus Greenland and the Farao Island. Denmark ... [More]


Please Login or Register to post a comment.


 Total Posts: 7,315,060    Topics: 300,995    Members: 198,029

 Not a member yet ? Click here to join - registration is free and only takes a moment!
Recent news and articles