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Ancient Mysteries

Ancient Egyptian mummy unearthed near Luxor

November 14, 2016 | Comment icon 13 comments



The tomb was found near the ancient Egyptian city of Luxor. Image Credit: CC BY 3.0 Marc Ryckaert
Discovered in a tomb by Spanish archaeologists, the well-preserved mummy dates back over 3,000 years.
Described by Egypt's antiquities ministry as being in "very good condition", the mummy, which is bound in plaster and linen, was found inside a brightly colored wooden sarcophagus.

The tomb it was found in was unearthed on the banks of the Nile near the ancient city of Luxor.

Archaeologists believe that it belonged to the nobleman Amenrenef, a servant of the royal household of the warrior king Thutmose III, the sixth Pharaoh of the Eighteenth Dynasty.

Thutmose III was well known for ordering the construction of temples and tombs during this era.

His own tomb was discovered in the Valley of the Kings by Victor Loret all the way back in 1898.

Source: The Guardian | Comments (13)


Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #4 Posted by Hanslune 6 years ago
Perhaps we should ask Kmt-Sesh...sounds like one of his relatives.
Comment icon #5 Posted by Jarocal 6 years ago
You meant descendant right?
Comment icon #6 Posted by Calibeliever 6 years ago
It looks amazingly well preserved.
Comment icon #7 Posted by Hanslune 6 years ago
Why no while Kmt-Sesh might live like a Pharaoh I would not consider it an overly decadent life style....okay the 40 resident priests is bit over the top but I do like his Volkswagen re-imaged as a solar boat.
Comment icon #8 Posted by paperdyer 6 years ago
I noticed that, too.  It surprises me have well the pigments used in ancients paints hold up to the ages.  true the paints weren't exposed to the elements, but 3000 years is one long time.
Comment icon #9 Posted by Gingitsune 6 years ago
It was probably painted with ocher (yellow and red, you make red but heating yellow) and Egyptian blue. Ocher is what they paint Lascaux with, it's forever. Or at least, humanity will die out before your art change hue. Egyptian blue is another lasting pigment which was discovered in Ancient Egypt.
Comment icon #10 Posted by kmt_sesh 6 years ago
  I've never met Mr. Amenrenef and don't think we're related, although perhaps we were neighbors at some point. I also dubt there's any connection to Tuthmosis III. Amenrenef's coffin is of the cartonnage type, and would date to Dynasty 22 or 23; I personally would hazard a guess of early to mid-Dynasty 22, based on the design. That's Third Intermediate Period, whereas Tuthmosis III reigned in Dynasty 18 of the New Kingdom. Whatever the case, it's a beautiful coffin. Due to the plaster base and varnish, pigments on cartonnages often preserve really well. I've never owned a Volkswagen but, funn... [More]
Comment icon #11 Posted by kmt_sesh 6 years ago
On a separate and unrelated note, I might as well use this moment to apologize for my extended absence. I spent the last week in the hospital and am now on dialysis, which sounds awful and does indeed suck, but because of treatment I'm already feeling better than I have for quite some time. I'm back home now. Let me know if anyone has a spare kidney. That's probably the only way I'll get off dialysis. I don't think our mummies' kidneys at the museum will be of any use (if they even still have theirs).
Comment icon #12 Posted by kmt_sesh 6 years ago
Here I am again. This is what happens when I haven't posted in a week, and there's something ancient Egypt to discuss. I think I understand the mistaken connection with Tuthmosis III. The little tomb was found by the Tuthmosis III Temple Project, which is in Deir el Bahri. This is also where you find the sprawling temple-tomb of Montuhotep II (Dynasty 11) and of course the massive mortuary temple of Hatshepsut (Dynasty 18). This specific area is filled with tombs and burials dating from the Middle Kingdom through the Late Period, and probably beyond (I'm pulling from memory). Some even date ba... [More]
Comment icon #13 Posted by ShadowSot 6 years ago
I was worried it was something. Your absence was noted, and your presence missed.   Give a day, and I'll scrounge up a kidney. All I need is a short dress, some alcohol, and tool.


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