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Asteroid narrowly avoids striking the Earth


Posted on Tuesday, 10 January, 2017 | Comment icon 30 comments

Asteroids still pose a very real threat to our planet. Image Credit: NASA
A previously unknown asteroid dubbed 2017 AG13 passed between the Earth and the Moon yesterday.
The space rock, which was around the same size as the one that exploded over Chelyabinsk, Russia back in 2013, was only picked up for the first time by astronomers at the weekend.

It went on to pass around half way between the Earth and the Moon at 16km per second.


The fact that it was only detected for the first time mere days before it passed us by however shows just how vulnerable we still are to threats from space. If it had been much larger and had actually been on a direct collision course then it would have been impossible to do anything to stop it.

According to the Planetary Society, only 60% of near-Earth asteroids larger than 1.5km have been spotted, meaning that there are still some monsters out there hurtling through space.

According to a recent White House document on asteroid strike preparedness however, the chances of the Earth being hit by one of these objects within the next 100 years is only around 0.01%.

Source: News.com.au | Comments (30)

Tags: Asteroid, Earth

Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #21 Posted by Calibeliever on 11 January, 2017, 20:13
Yeah, but that's a pretty big horseshoe!
Comment icon #22 Posted by MissJatti on 15 January, 2017, 10:00
I wonder how much damage this asteroid, would of done if it hit Earth 
Comment icon #23 Posted by Calibeliever on 15 January, 2017, 17:31
Hard to say exactly because there are so many variables we don't have. Size, angle of attack, composition of the object, etc. The diameter range they gave was roughly 35-100 ft and no info on density or composition. But at the extreme, a 100 ft dense rock meteor striking land at a 45 degree angle would release around 625 Kilotons of TNT's worth of energy (Hiroshima was about 15 KT). At a 35 ft diameter with the above parameters it would only be around 23 KT. If the rock is more porous, or the angle changes, or it strikes water, etc, the values change. Tunguska is estimated to have been between... [More]
Comment icon #24 Posted by toast on 15 January, 2017, 17:40
Impact simulator here.
Comment icon #25 Posted by AmbiguousInsight on 17 January, 2017, 19:22
Haha, instead of pouring money into some useless asteroid detection program, you should be happy the government funds *actual* important needs of humanity, such as this http://reason.com/blog/2016/03/07/this-university-of-oregon-study-on-femin *rolls eyes,shakes head*
Comment icon #26 Posted by Calibeliever on 17 January, 2017, 19:55
WTAF! Here's my favorite bit:   OK It's well-known I'm fairly liberal, and I'm all for whatever-you're-into-is-fine-by-me, but human-ice interactions? Huh?
Comment icon #27 Posted by AmbiguousInsight on 17 January, 2017, 19:59
Yep. Tax payer dollars funded this nonsense. Could've constructed a homeless shelter, or something of actual value could've been done instead of... *ahem* , "that". 
Comment icon #28 Posted by Peter B on 18 January, 2017, 12:48
Okay, so you don't agree with the idea of funding that study. So what? What's that got to do with this thread?
Comment icon #29 Posted by Calibeliever on 18 January, 2017, 13:37
Or, to your original point I think, they could have used some of that funding to increase our NEO discovery capabilities.
Comment icon #30 Posted by AmbiguousInsight on 18 January, 2017, 16:39
They could have/should have used ALL of that funding for anything else. 


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