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Space & Astronomy

Astronauts to undertake emergency spacewalk

May 22, 2017 | Comment icon 10 comments



Fortunately the broken relay has not placed the crew in any danger. Image Credit: NASA
The two-hour spacewalk, which is set to take place on Tuesday, will aim to repair a broken data relay box.
The box, which is understood to have failed completely, is one of two systems responsible for controlling radiators, solar arrays, cooling loops and other hardware aboard the station.

Beginning at around 8am EDT and lasting for two hours, the spacewalk will be undertaken by Expedition 51 Commander Peggy Whitson and Flight Engineer Jack Fischer.

Fortunately though, the broken relay is not believed to have put the crew in any danger.
"The cause of the MDM failure is not known," NASA wrote in a blog post.

"After a review of spacewalk preparations and crew readiness throughout the day Sunday, the decision was made to press ahead with the spacewalk on Tuesday."

The spacewalk will be the tenth for Whitson who recently broke the record for the longest cumulative time spent in space for a US astronaut. At 57, she is also the oldest woman ever to go in to space.

Source: Economic Times | Comments (10)


Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #1 Posted by EBE Hybrid 5 years ago
I hope that tey're not using Windows, It'll take sooooo many reboots to configure the O/S and re-install all the drivers and then there's the headache of finding all the license codes for all of the 3rd party programs....nightmare
Comment icon #2 Posted by EBE Hybrid 5 years ago
It'd be a hoot if they're using Android, Google Location Service would have a meltdown!
Comment icon #3 Posted by kartikg 5 years ago
won't nasa get a customized windows? or you were just being sarcastic? 
Comment icon #4 Posted by Derek Willis 5 years ago
Surely it would have made more sense locating the computer in a place where it could be accessed from inside the space station. For instance, I have my computer in my living room, and not on the roof of my house. 
Comment icon #5 Posted by EBE Hybrid 5 years ago
There may have been an element of "Dry Humor" involved, based on real life experience of Windows
Comment icon #6 Posted by BeastieRunner 5 years ago
Seem like an awfully long way to go just to reboot the system. Like something out of a movie.
Comment icon #7 Posted by paperdyer 5 years ago
According to the article, the module failed and needed to be replaced.  This isn't a simple reboot of a system. Based on the deion it sounds like a fairly critical system.  Luckily they have a spare.  If this was a business on Earth, you wouldn't have a spare, the vendor of the equipment wouldn't have one in stock that could be overnighted either. The vendor would have to order from China and 6 weeks later you still wouldn't have your part.  Customer service has been replaced with "Just in time" deliveries.  The concept sounds great except for one thing; IT DOESN"T WORK when you have no contro... [More]
Comment icon #8 Posted by EBE Hybrid 5 years ago
I seem to remember HAL predicting a system failure and informing Dave Bowman how long it would take before the failure became critical, and that was 16 years ago in 2001!!!
Comment icon #9 Posted by Hammerclaw 5 years ago
No that was the hypothetical future politicians--and NASA --unwittingly scuttled. In order to realize their grandiose vision of a reusable spacecraft and cheap access to orbit, NASA had to give up their heavy lift capability in the Saturn 5. In retrospect, it was a bad decision.
Comment icon #10 Posted by Calibeliever 5 years ago
I was at a small business seminar at JPL in the late 90's and there was a guy who's only job was to locate 386 chips because they were the latest "flight certified" (I think because the math co-processor on the 486 and Pentium had a flaw). I know they were moving to single core about that time also. The point being, most of the chips (some of them custom built by JPL subcontractors) on the ISS have a fraction of the power of the device in your hand right now. 


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