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World's deepest fish found 7,966 meters down


Posted on Thursday, 30 November, 2017 | Comment icon 11 comments

Can any fish live deeper down than this ? Image Credit: YouTube / University of Washington
A new species of extremely deep-sea snailfish has been found in the depths of the Mariana Trench.
Discovered almost five miles beneath the surface, this ghost-like fish is around twice the length of a cigar and has skin so translucent that it is possible to see its internal organs.

At these depths, the pressure is so extreme that it is like having the equivalent weight of an entire elephant pressing down on every square inch of your entire body.

Below this depth, the pressure becomes so overwhelming that it can even destabilize proteins.

The new species, Pseudoliparis swirei, is named after an officer aboard the HMS Challenger which discovered thousands of new species during an expedition in the 1870s.

"We named this fish after him in acknowledgment of the crews that serve on oceanographic research vessels," said Mackenzie Gerringer, a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Washington.

"It takes a lot of people to keep a ship running and we wanted to sincerely thank them."


Source: National Geographic | Comments (11)

Tags: Snailfish, Mariana Trench

Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #2 Posted by dragon1440 on 30 November, 2017, 17:20
Are the little white onez babies or did they discover 2 fish and only big one gets attn lol
Comment icon #3 Posted by paperdyer on 30 November, 2017, 17:41
They sort of look like big Guppies.† I wonder if the breed like them.
Comment icon #4 Posted by seanjo on 30 November, 2017, 18:17
Are the tiddlers Pseudoliparis swirei, or another species?
Comment icon #5 Posted by Guyver on 30 November, 2017, 19:32
Considering the amount of pressure that exists at the bottom of the ocean.....this is truly amazing.††
Comment icon #6 Posted by pallidin on 30 November, 2017, 20:50
Yeah, I hear you on that. And from the article... At these depths, the pressure is so extreme that it is like having the equivalent weight of an entire elephant pressing down on every square inch of your entire body.
Comment icon #7 Posted by khol on 1 December, 2017, 3:44
Its all about balance† https://www.scienceabc.com/nature/animals/deep-sea-fishes-not-get-crushed-pressure-sea-floor.html
Comment icon #8 Posted by Bunzilla on 2 December, 2017, 3:43
Woah, they're cute! They remind me of big tadpoles.
Comment icon #9 Posted by Alaric on 5 December, 2017, 0:29
I used to live on Mt Tapochau on the island of Saipan in the Northern Marianas... the ocean is so crazy deep there that†Tapochau †(at only 474m) is†the highest mountain in the world when measured from the bottom of the ocean.†Wikipedia will tell you itís Mauna Kea, but thatís only 10,000 some meters...†Tapochau is over 11,000 meters (474+10,994).
Comment icon #10 Posted by Alaric on 5 December, 2017, 3:34
Tapochau is the tip of an enormous underwater mountain range that dwarfs the Himalayas. Did a lot diving when I lived on Saipan, lots of interesting ocean life around that area. Water is super clear in places. Dove the Shoun Maru in Rota and visibility†was an amazing†300 feet (90m+)... got weird vertigo, diving down into that... felt like I was somehow†falling up. http://www.diverota.com/dives/shoun-01hayashi.htm The CNMI chain also includes Tinian (of USS Indianapolis fame) ... though†thatís the †kind of ďinterestingď†ocean life Iím†not too interested in checking out. †
Comment icon #11 Posted by taniwha on 6 December, 2017, 8:59
Maybe they feed on the plastic waste no doubt littering the trench.


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