Thursday, April 26, 2018
Contact us    |    Advertise    |   Help   RSS icon Twitter icon Facebook icon
    Home  ·  News  ·  Forum  ·  Stories  ·  Image Gallery  ·  Columns  ·  Encyclopedia  ·  Videos
Find: in

New study hints at 'Oumuamua's origins


Posted on Monday, 19 March, 2018 | Comment icon 8 comments

The asteroid is the first confirmed interstellar visitor. Image Credit: ESO / M. Kornmesser
Researchers believe that it is very likely that the interstellar asteroid came from a binary star system.
The 400-meter-long asteroid, which flew past our planet back in October, became the focus of much debate and intrigue after it was found to have come from a distant solar system.

Now researchers who have been attempting to work out exactly where it originated have determined that it most likely came from a solar system that, unlike our own, has two stars rather than one.

To come to this conclusion, lead author and planetary scientist Dr. Alan Jackson and colleagues went about testing how efficient binary star systems are at ejecting objects.

Their findings indicated that 'Oumuamua most likely came from a binary system with a relatively hot, high-mass star as this would have a greater concentration of rocky objects situated closer in.

The asteroid is also likely to have been ejected sometime during the formation of planetary bodies.

"It's really odd that the first object we would see from outside our system would be an asteroid, because a comet would be a lot easier to spot and the Solar System ejects many more comets than asteroids," said Jackson.

"The same way we use comets to better understand planet formation in our own Solar System, maybe this curious object can tell us more about how planets form in other systems."

Source: Phys.org | Comments (8)

Tags: Oumuamua, Asteroid

Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #1 Posted by seanjo on 19 March, 2018, 16:45
The Solar system is such a minutely small target, cosmologically speaking, it's a wonder anything passes through from other systems.
Comment icon #2 Posted by paperdyer on 19 March, 2018, 17:40
Based on this article, I wonder if there is anything left over from our Solar system whizzing through a Solar system elsewhere and getting the same interest..
Comment icon #3 Posted by Waspie_Dwarf on 19 March, 2018, 17:47
Actually the universe has so many objects like 'Oumuamua it's a wonder we haven't seen one before. It is believed that a cubic parsec of space contains around a trillion such objects, withup to 10,000 passing within the orbit of Neptuneat an given time.
Comment icon #4 Posted by Waspie_Dwarf on 19 March, 2018, 17:51
Short answer: yes (although no one can be sure about the interest it is getting). Although most interstellar objects originating from our solar system would probably come from the Oort clod rather than the inner solar system.
Comment icon #5 Posted by Nzo on 19 March, 2018, 18:40
Looks like 100% conjecture from my point of view. I don't see any solid evidence for anything.
Comment icon #6 Posted by Waspie_Dwarf on 19 March, 2018, 19:15
Would you like to provide some evidence for your statement or is it just 100% conjecture from you?
Comment icon #7 Posted by Silent Trinity on 20 March, 2018, 8:03
I think there will be objects like this whizzing throughout the universe, it is just that we happened to catch sight of this one and were enthralled by it's unusual shape. Fascinating what forces must have been at play to create such a shape, that is if it wasn't part of a much larger more familiar looking interstellar body and this is almost like a "shard" that has broken away....
Comment icon #8 Posted by Nzo on 20 March, 2018, 8:21
Well, if there is no concrete evidence/data/analysis that the study uses therefore it is just opinion. Look I can do it too... My OPINION is that that large asteroid is really just some alien's universal art exhibit. Its called 'The Shard'. Do I have proof of it, no. But it seems that today as long as you use the right words, like Study or research etc. all of a sudden it instantly gains credibility. In fact I believe Slashdot had something on how a lot more research today is bogus because its unreproducible and basically falls through the cracks. I suggest whomever funded this study get thei... [More]


Please Login or Register to post a comment.


  On the forums
Star map update to feature 1.7 billion stars
4-26-2018
Astronomers from ESA's Gaia mission will tomorrow release the largest map of our galaxy ever created.
Fossil footprints hint at giant sloth chase
4-26-2018
New evidence has been discovered to suggest that our ancestors hunted down giant prehistoric sloths.
Was ancient 'hashtag' the first human symbol?
4-25-2018
Hashtag-like etchings found on a rock in South Africa's Blombos Cave are thought to be over 100,000 years old.
'World's largest mosquito' discovered in China
4-25-2018
A Chinese entomologist found the insect, which has a wingspan of 11.5cm, during a field trip last year.
Featured Videos
Gallery icon 
Could you survive a nuclear bomb ?
Posted 4-24-2018 | 0 comments
If someone dropped an atomic bomb on a city, what would be your chances of survival ?
 
What does space smell like ?
Posted 4-23-2018 | 0 comments
Does the vacuum of space actually smell of anything and if so, what ?
 
Why is US paper money green ?
Posted 4-22-2018 | 0 comments
Simon Whistler investigates why the color green was used when printing US bank notes.
 
 View: More videos
Stories & Experiences
Dreams and clues to the future
3-31-2018 | Philippines and Germany
 
Black cloaked figure
3-31-2018 | Carlisle, Cumbria, England
 
Three knocks
3-8-2018 | Canada
 
Two shadows of me
3-8-2018 | Bellflower, LA
 
I think I know what I saw
3-5-2018 | Near Sultan, Washington
 
Ghost, or something else ?
3-5-2018 | Ohio, USA
 
 
Black hole in Bismarck
2-14-2018 | Mandan
 
 
Trapped and chased
2-9-2018 | Saskatchewan canada
 

         More stories | Send us your story
 
Top   |  Home   |   Forum   |   News   |   Image Gallery   |  Columns   |   Encyclopedia   |   Videos   |   Polls
UM-X 10.7 Unexplained-Mysteries.com 2001-2018
Terms   |   Privacy Policy   |   Cookies   |   Advertise   |   Contact   |   Help/FAQ