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Terrifying parasitic wasp found in the Amazon


Posted on Monday, 9 July, 2018 | Comment icon 7 comments

The wasp's stinger is almost as long as its body. Image Credit: Kari Kaunisto / University of Turku
Scientists have discovered a new species of wasp that lays its eggs on spiders using its massive stinger.
Found deep in the Amazon rainforest, the new species was discovered by researchers from the University of Turku in Finland and has been named Clistopyga crassicaudata.

"I have studied tropical parasitoid wasps for a long time, but I have never seen anything like it," said Professor Ilari E. Saaksjarvi. "The stinger looks like a fierce weapon."

According to the report, the wasp's enormous appendage is capable of stinging a victim numerous times and, in addition to injecting venom, can also be used to lay eggs.

Typically the insect will find a spider, paralyze it with venom and then lay its eggs on top of it. When they eventually hatch, the larva will eat the spider alive as well its own eggs or hatchlings.

Suffice to say, this is one insect that you really don't want to tangle with.

Source: Popular Mechanics | Comments (7)

Tags: Wasp, Stinger

Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #1 Posted by and then on 6 July, 2018, 21:39
Some entrepreneur in OZ should import THAT little piece of joy, immediately. It will find it has "come home" to be among friends
Comment icon #2 Posted by Kittens Are Jerks on 6 July, 2018, 22:15
First thing I did was compare its stinger to that of other wasp species, and OMG, it's huge! Keep it away from me. UGH!
Comment icon #3 Posted by ChaosRose on 6 July, 2018, 23:09
I wonder if they discovered it by getting stung. *shudders*
Comment icon #4 Posted by NightScreams on 6 July, 2018, 23:22
"Thewaspsseek out spiders living in nests and paralyse them with a quick venom injection. Then the female wasp lays its eggs on the spider and the hatching larva eats the paralysed spider as well as the possible spidereggsor hatchlings." Nature is just seriously brutal. I thought people were bad but at least no one is going to inject me with paralysis and suffer till some eggs eat me.
Comment icon #5 Posted by openozy on 7 July, 2018, 3:51
Last summer I got stung on the back of the neck by a paper wasp,stung a bit but nothing too bad,by the time I walked back to the house was vomiting and covered head to toe in itchy lumps.Spent half a day in hospital and now have to carry an epi pen.We def have enough deadly stuff here.I now hate wasps.
Comment icon #6 Posted by paperdyer on 9 July, 2018, 15:19
I have some wasps that keep trying to build their nest between and storm door and entry door. Persistent , too. I kept knocking the nest down, they kept rebuilding it. I finally had to get the exterminator. They finally took the hint until next year as this is a yearly thing with them.
Comment icon #7 Posted by Orphalesion on 9 July, 2018, 16:04
Why is this terrifying? It lays its larvae into spiders, not humans... Now the human bot fly, that's scary.


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