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Scientists announce major new LHC discovery


Posted on Wednesday, 29 August, 2018 | Comment icon 26 comments

The Large Hadron Collider is still making important discoveries. Image Credit: CC BY-SA 3.0 Maximilien Brice
The world's largest atom smasher - the Large Hadron Collider - has found evidence of Higgs boson decay.
Not content with finding the long-sought Higgs boson, the scientists behind the Large Hadron Collider in Geneva have been continuing their efforts to unravel the secrets of the universe by pushing the world-famous particle accelerator to increasingly high levels of energy and intensity.

Now it seems as though their efforts have paid off once again thanks to the first confirmed observation of Higgs bosons decaying into a pair of fundamental particles known as bottom quarks.

The discovery is important because it means that the experimental data strongly agrees with theoretical predictions, as oppose to challenging the foundations of our understanding.

"This observation is a milestone in the exploration of the Higgs boson," said spokesman Karl Jakobs.

"It shows that the ATLAS and CMS experiments have achieved deep understanding of their data and a control of backgrounds that surpasses expectations."

"ATLAS has now observed all couplings of the Higgs boson to the heavy quarks and leptons of the third generation as well as all major production modes."

The findings take scientists one step closer to understanding why the Higgs boson even exists.

"The experiments continue to home in on the Higgs particle, which is often considered a portal to new physics," said Eckhard Elsen, CERN Director for Research and Computing.

"These beautiful and early achievements also underscore our plans for upgrading the LHC to substantially increase the statistics."

"The analysis methods have now been shown to reach the precision required for exploration of the full physics landscape, including hopefully new physics that so far hides so subtly."

Source: Live Science | Comments (26)

Tags: Large Hadron Collider

Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #17 Posted by Torchwood on 29 August, 2018, 19:39
Yes they are.  But they can affect the field they are in, and perhaps the field can affect them in return....just like with the magnet thing.   As to the practical ability to manipulate the field to do something to the particles...well, lets look at another sort of duality: Spacetime!  Everything is limited by the Cosmic speed limit (C!) , you can only go so fast through space time. Some of that speed is your passage through time, some through space. The faster you move in space, the slower you move in time.  Likewise the slower you move in space , the faster you move in time. And its pretty e... [More]
Comment icon #18 Posted by keithisco on 29 August, 2018, 19:46
You just had to mention Spacetime!  Nope, not happening, definitely not going to get involved today... finish off my prep for tomorrow (Chinese delegation to woo). before we get onto whether there are 10 or 26 Dimensions.
Comment icon #19 Posted by sci-nerd on 29 August, 2018, 19:46
You can't blame a nerd for dreaming 
Comment icon #20 Posted by danydandan on 29 August, 2018, 20:45
Sorry your wrong, one can't just magically conjure particles into existence. Theoretically all the higgs field does is allow particles to interact with each other. ie give mass etcetera. One can't control this energy.
Comment icon #21 Posted by sci-nerd on 29 August, 2018, 20:52
Control might have been a bit optimistic. But we could learn the conditions required for each particle to emerge, and by copying those conditions, produce said particles. Right?
Comment icon #22 Posted by danydandan on 29 August, 2018, 21:18
No, sorry. The uncertainty principle would be violated if we knew the exact conditions. Even virtual particles, and all stuff measured at the LHC are as a result of interactions between other particles. IE smashing them together. We can't predict anything really about what will happen as a result of these interactions.
Comment icon #23 Posted by sci-nerd on 29 August, 2018, 21:26
Yet...! 
Comment icon #24 Posted by danydandan on 29 August, 2018, 21:29
I strongly feel that if we produce a quantum computer powerful enough, we might be able to predict these interactions, however we will always have uncertainty and inherent error in our devices used for observations. Thus I don't see the uncertainty principle being violated.
Comment icon #25 Posted by pallidin on 30 August, 2018, 1:27
Great article!
Comment icon #26 Posted by Seti42 on 30 August, 2018, 1:38
"bottom quarks". Sounds like a sexual euphemism. 


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