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Musk: 'Starship 2.0 could be twice as big'


Posted on Wednesday, 4 September, 2019 | Comment icon 2 comments

Musk is certainly not short on ambition. Image Credit: SpaceX / Elon Musk
Elon Musk has hinted that SpaceX's next-generation interplanetary spacecraft could be absolutely huge.
Designed to serve as the reusable second stage of the Big Falcon Rocket (BFR), Starship (1.0) will be capable of carrying astronauts and cargo all the way to the surface of Mars.

The spacecraft has undergone several name changes since it was first announced, having previously transitioned from Mars Colonial Transporter (MCT) to Interplanetary Transport System (ITS).

SpaceX conducted its latest free-flight test of the Starship Hopper test vehicle back on August 27th, thus bringing the company one step closer to launching a full-scale prototype into orbit.

Not content with stopping there however, Musk has been contemplating another, even larger vehicle.
This 'Starship 2.0', he maintains, would be twice the size of the current spacecraft.

This would make it a whopping 240 meters tall and 18 meters wide with support for payloads of up to 800,000kg. Such a launch vehicle would need 60 Raptor engines just to get off the ground.

Of course it's still very early days to be contemplating Starship's successor, however it is always interesting to learn what Musk is thinking when it comes to the future of spaceflight.

It remains to be seen whether or not things will proceed the way he predicts.

Source: Universe Today | Comments (2)


Tags: Starship, SpaceX


Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #1 Posted by Jon the frog on 4 September, 2019, 17:39
For me the next generation of space ship will be assembled in space, with an orbital space-hub receiving flight from earth for transferring payload and people. They need to push for a space base soon. Moon with less gravity can be an interesting place to build some kind of space hub too.
Comment icon #2 Posted by highdesert50 on 4 September, 2019, 21:31
Back in the 1970s, the L5 Society recommended construction of a space colony at the L5 Lagrange point. L4 and L5, being stable gravitational points, do not require fuel expenditure to maintain equilibrium yet provide for some interesting opportunities, such as what you suggest. Perhaps, now that we are becoming more adept at reusable orbital machinery, this might again be conceptually explored.


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