Saturday, April 20, 2024
Contact    |    RSS icon Twitter icon Facebook icon  
Unexplained Mysteries
You are viewing: Home > News > Palaeontology > News story
Welcome Guest ( Login or Register )  
All ▾
Search Submit

Palaeontology

Meet one of mankind's earliest ancestors

By T.K. Randall
March 26, 2020 · Comment icon 4 comments

A glimpse into the past. Image Credit: Sohail Wasif / University of California Riverside
Scientists have identified a worm-like creature that thrived on our planet some 555 million years ago.
Smaller than a grain of rice, this tiny creature, which was unearthed in the Ediacaran Period deposits of Nilpena, South Australia, is the earliest known forerunner of both humans and animals.

Known as Ikaria wariootia, it is the earliest known example of a bilaterian - a type of organism that has a front and back, two symmetrical sides and two openings on its front and rear connected by its gut.

The appearance of this basic, yet critical form paved the way for a wide variety of more complex organisms and it is the basis for everything from the largest dinosaurs to the tiniest insects.

"The origin and early evolution of bilaterians is a huge question for evolutionary biologists and paleobiologists because, of course, we are bilaterians," said study co-author Prof Mary Droser.
"It is a natural instinct to want to know when our ancestors first appear[ed] and what they look[ed] like."

Droser, along with doctoral graduate Scott Evans, made the discovery by using a three-dimensional laser scanner to examine tiny fossilized burrows found in the rock.

"We thought these animals should have existed during this interval, but always understood they would be difficult to recognize," said Evans.

"Once we had the 3D scans, we knew that we had made an important discovery."

Source: Phys.org | Comments (4)




Other news and articles
Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #1 Posted by Carnoferox 4 years ago
It's a bit misleading to call it a "human relative" specifically, when it's equally related to the majority of other animals.
Comment icon #2 Posted by Carnoferox 4 years ago
It's not the LUCA though, it's an early bilaterian animal. Those are two very different things. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Last_universal_common_ancestor https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bilateria
Comment icon #3 Posted by Carnoferox 4 years ago
If you are referring strictly to the human lineage it wouldn't be a "universal ancestor" then. Not only that, but there is no evidence that Ikaria is ancestral to all other bilaterians, only that it is the oldest member of the clade Bilateria.
Comment icon #4 Posted by Seti42 4 years ago
That 3D image for this article makes the creature look like its gigantic, IMO. Like some awesome sci-fi worm-monster that in large numbers could destroy nations.


Please Login or Register to post a comment.


Our new book is out now!
Book cover

The Unexplained Mysteries
Book of Weird News

 AVAILABLE NOW 

Take a walk on the weird side with this compilation of some of the weirdest stories ever to grace the pages of a newspaper.

Click here to learn more

We need your help!
Patreon logo

Support us on Patreon

 BONUS CONTENT 

For less than the cost of a cup of coffee, you can gain access to a wide range of exclusive perks including our popular 'Lost Ghost Stories' series.

Click here to learn more

Recent news and articles