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Natural World

Real-life 'angry birds' attack delivery drones

September 28, 2021 | Comment icon 15 comments



Ravens and drones definitely don't mix. Image Credit: CC BY-SA 3.0 Franco Atirador
Ravens seem to have developed a severe dislike of delivery drones in the skies over Canberra, Australia.
The idea of delivering parcels to recipients via autonomous aerial drones seems to have been gaining more and more traction in recent years, opening the door to a future in which items we order online could be deposited in our gardens mere hours after clicking 'confirm purchase' on the website.

In Canberra, however, an increase in delivery drone use has met with some unexpected opposition in the form of ravens which have started attacking the flying machines on sight.

One customer, Ben Roberts, has become acutely aware of the problem after going outside to await the delivery of his morning coffee via drone each day.

"It's a matter of time before they bring one down," he said.

The bird attacks have become so common in the area that the drone company has been forced to pause flights until a solution to the problem can be found.
It is assumed that the ravens must be perceiving the drones as some sort of territorial threat.

According to Wayne Condon, chief pilot and instructor with UAV Training Australia, it is best to avoid flying drones near bird nesting sites and to fly them early in the morning to avoid the attacks.

He also suggests backing the drones away from the birds if an attack does occur, however given that the drones are autonomous, this is certainly not an ideal solution.

"We have identified some ravens demonstrating territorial behaviour in a small part of our delivery area in the suburb of Harrison, and we've asked local ornithological experts to investigate this further to ensure we continue to have minimal impact on birdlife," said a drone company spokesperson.

"Service will be temporarily paused for a small number of our customers in Harrison during this time."



Source: Canberra Times | Comments (15)


Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #6 Posted by OverSword 4 months ago
Nobody shoots crows in the middle of a city.
Comment icon #7 Posted by Abramelin 4 months ago
No. They do in rural areas. That's why many crows migrate to cities where they feel more safe. Despite that, they still don't trust people one bit, and will try to chase them off during breeding time. An understandable behaviour. †
Comment icon #8 Posted by OverSword 4 months ago
It's got nothing to do with humans, they chase every other kind of animal off.† Seen them dive bombing dogs.
Comment icon #9 Posted by Skulduggery 4 months ago
Coffee... delivered by a drone??! How quaint.
Comment icon #10 Posted by pallidin 4 months ago
When I fly my drone (DJI Mavic Air 2) I try to be cautious around birds, especially raptors.
Comment icon #11 Posted by Seti42 4 months ago
Good for the birds!
Comment icon #12 Posted by Abramelin 4 months ago
Dogs, cats, yes: potentially dangerous animals. Like humans.
Comment icon #13 Posted by The Silver Shroud 3 months ago
I hope they don't start culling the birds for acting like birds.
Comment icon #14 Posted by Jon the frog 3 months ago
Drone propellers can cut stuff up... it's dangerous for the raven to attack it, interesting that they attack the tail !
Comment icon #15 Posted by curiouse 3 months ago
You canít blame the Crow. We are seeing the future people! Iím sure in time those buzzing drones will be buzzing everywhere, delivering junk to us.†


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