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Evidence of British big cats discovered


Posted on Monday, 4 November, 2013 | Comment icon 16 comments

The Beast of Bodmin was thought to be a big cat. Image Credit: CC BY-SA 3.0 Rute Martins
Dr Andrew Hemmings has found tantalizing evidence that large cats are roaming wild across the UK.
Sightings of large predatory cats have persisted across the British Isles for years. While it has long been suspected that a population of these animals has been roaming the countryside, conclusive evidence of their existence in the UK has been thin on the ground.

Dr Andrew Hemmings of the Royal Agricultural University has been conducting his own study in to the phenomenon over the last 12 months and hopes to determine once and for all whether there really are large cats on the loose across Britain. To do this, he's been examining the remains of wild animals believed to have been killed by one.

Supplied by volunteers, farmers and landowners, the remains each show signs of an attack by a predatory creature. Smaller predators such as badgers and foxes can be quickly ruled out, however eliminating domestic dogs as the culprit is a bit more difficult. To achieve this, Dr Hemmings analyzed the indentations of the carnassial teeth which are further apart in big cats than in dogs.

"At the moment, there are three I have found which are weighing in favor of the cat, so it is very tentatively pointing that way," he said. "All three are certainly wider than you would expect to find in a dog imprint. But we need to let the sample size build up before we have anything approaching a statistical basis."

Source: Telegraph | Comments (16)

Tags: Alien Big Cats


 
Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #7 Posted by Slave2Fate on 5 November, 2013, 0:20
I believe I've seen enough credible photo's over the last few years to have no problem believing in big cats in England. I would presume they're not native however and therefore not true cryptids. True, a displaced animal does not a cryptid make.
Comment icon #8 Posted by Sundew on 5 November, 2013, 1:15
During the time of the Pax Britannia no doubt many exotic plants and animals were brought from all over the world for zoos, circuses, and sideshows and it is not terribly unlikely some escaped or released and possibly formed the nexus of a breeding population. One only has to look at Florida where Macaque monkeys used in the old Tarzan films have not only survived but thrived and are spreading out in places around the state. Lynx, Bobcats, even Leopards might to quite well in Britain.
Comment icon #9 Posted by the doctor 88 on 5 November, 2013, 1:38
They are in the Australian bush too.I didn't believe it till i saw one. And it was not a wild domestic cat as i am a tracker and and seen thousand of wild domestic cats.
Comment icon #10 Posted by Timonthy on 5 November, 2013, 2:44
So the doctor has 3 carcasses with bites which tentatively point to big cats. Not very exciting...
Comment icon #11 Posted by HollyDolly on 5 November, 2013, 16:49
Got to agree with Sundew. Look at that place in ohio where that man let the animals out before killing himself. Around San Antonio we have Primarily Primates and another sanctuary for wild animals. That's like north of me,is Natural Bridge Caverns Wildlife Ranch.They too have various wild animals,no big cats I know of. But whose to say one of the critters might not get out by accident some day. I know the property is quite large and you can drive through it. there aren't alot of homes near it,only other ranches mainly,but still,things do happen. I have seen coyotes,deer and even a dead red fox... [More]
Comment icon #12 Posted by OverSword on 5 November, 2013, 19:18
During the time of the Pax Britannia no doubt many exotic plants and animals were brought from all over the world for zoos, circuses, and sideshows and it is not terribly unlikely some escaped or released and possibly formed the nexus of a breeding population. One only has to look at Florida where Macaque monkeys used in the old Tarzan films have not only survived but thrived and are spreading out in places around the state. Lynx, Bobcats, even Leopards might to quite well in Britain. I would probably guess later than Pax Brittania myself. Someones exotic pet(s) let lose or escaped.
Comment icon #13 Posted by Sundew on 5 November, 2013, 20:05
I would probably guess later than Pax Brittania myself. Someones exotic pet(s) let lose or escaped. Perhaps true, I was just thinking of a time when things were less heavily regulated, back think you could probably keep an elephant on you estate if you had the room, lol!
Comment icon #14 Posted by Oppono Astos on 5 November, 2013, 20:35
Over the years i have heard of various claims about deliberate releases of exotics to the wild after the introduction of the Dangerous Wild Animals Act 1976
Comment icon #15 Posted by Loreoffolk on 12 November, 2013, 19:52
the problem i have with most big cat pictures there is nothing near to refrence the scale of the cat and when it is it isnt big
Comment icon #16 Posted by SkeptcByMindBelievrByHeart on 19 February, 2014, 13:10
its a experiment gone wrong, in the lab they found a big fat black domesticated cat, since scientist already tested the metabolism rate to be successful on rats, which made them lose tons of weight. for cats its a different story, it made them bigger and bigger and bigger


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