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Freshwater octopus to blame for lake deaths?


Posted on Monday, 23 December, 2013 | Comment icon 29 comments


Could something be lurking below ? Image Credit: CC BY-SA 3.0 Eistreter

An undiscovered species of octopus could be lurking in the depths of Oklahoma's otherwise tranquil lakes.

A spate of unexplained drowning deaths in Lake Thunderbird, Lake Tenkiller and Lake Oolagah in Oklahoma has lead some to theorize that there could be something lurking beneath the waters that we don't yet know about.

The most popular (and controversial) theory is that the culprit is a new species of octopus that has developed the ability to live in fresh water. The so-called "Oklahoma Octopus" was even featured on an episode of Animal Planetís "Lost Tapes" series and is believed to drown its victims by dragging them below the surface using its powerful arms.

The feasibility of such a creature remains however heavily in doubt and despite the widespread success of the octopus as a species, no cephalopod has ever managed to transition entirely to a freshwater environment.

Skeptics argue that a large catfish, as oppose to an octopus, is most likely to be responsible for the mysterious deaths occurring in the lakes, but as with many such mysteries it is unlikely that we can ever entirely rule out the possibility that an unknown cephalopod could be lurking in the depths, waiting patiently for a hapless swimmer to pass overhead.

   
Source: Yahoo! News | Comments (29)

Tags: Octopus


 
Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #20 Posted by keninsc on 24 December, 2013, 5:44
My first thought when I saw the subject was, "A fresh water octopus? Really?"
Comment icon #21 Posted by davros of skaro on 24 December, 2013, 9:35
Fresh water Octopus to me is fried Calamari with a cup of icewater, and a squeeze of Lemon.
Comment icon #22 Posted by davros of skaro on 24 December, 2013, 9:44
I had a Fish try to engulf my big toe once.It did not have any teeth, and I did not see it.I got freaked, and shook it off.I figured it must have thought my toe was a fat Maggot.I sure would hate to have a Snapping Turtle bite anything on me.
Comment icon #23 Posted by Sundew on 24 December, 2013, 13:38
Ha, ha, that's great and we must protect them at all cost, being the primary food of the sasquatch! NIce one, lol!
Comment icon #24 Posted by Mr. Smith on 24 December, 2013, 21:26
I'm more floored that we have a land-adapted air-breathing octopuss than a freshwater adaptation.
Comment icon #25 Posted by RedSquirrel on 24 December, 2013, 21:51
Thank you, I've been fighting for them for years. They are truly majestic.
Comment icon #26 Posted by qxcontinuum on 25 December, 2013, 16:28
the cat fish can grow up to 5 meters in europe . They can be very ferocious predators not on;y bottom feeders. Every fisherman knows that!
Comment icon #27 Posted by joc on 26 December, 2013, 4:36
Yep. And if one is swimming along and grabs your foot...dude...you are going down.
Comment icon #28 Posted by Sakari on 26 December, 2013, 4:51
Comment icon #29 Posted by Taun on 28 December, 2013, 1:08
No one swims in Thunderbird... it is for boating and is a campground/picnic area....


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