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'Vampire injections' can reverse ageing


Posted on Monday, 5 May, 2014 | Comment icon 27 comments

Can young blood rejuvenate an older person ? Image Credit: CC BY-SA 2.0 Andrew Magill
Injecting someone with blood from a younger person could help to stave off the ageing process.
In a move that sounds more like a plot from a Dracula movie than a modern science experiment, researchers have been able to reverse the ageing process in older mice by injecting them with the blood of their younger counterparts.

Older mice that had been injected with the younger blood were found to be far more adept at navigating a maze environment than those that hadn't. "It was as if these old brains were recharged by young blood," said study senior author Tony Wyss-Coray.

It is believed that the method works by rejuvenating cells in the hippocampus, the region of the brain responsible for learning and memory.

If the same advantages occur in humans then the research could open up a whole new world of possibilities. The technique could be especially effective at treating age-related brain diseases such as dementia or Alzheimer's while offering a potential way to stall or reverse the ageing process.

"The therapeutic implications are profound if this mechanism holds true in people," said biologist Matthew Kaeberlein.

Source: Discovery News | Comments (27)

Tags: Vampire, Blood, Ageing


 
Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #18 Posted by regeneratia on 7 May, 2014, 3:07
I think it has to do with DHEA levels of younger people.
Comment icon #19 Posted by TheGreatBeliever on 7 May, 2014, 15:23
imagine someone else's blood in u.. my body's already tingling now!
Comment icon #20 Posted by DieChecker on 7 May, 2014, 20:40
I wonder how the effects of a younger person's blood added to your own compares with blood doping? Athletes do so to get added oxygen exchange, for better performance at athletics. Would added oxygen contribute to what the blood study saw here?
Comment icon #21 Posted by regeneratia on 7 May, 2014, 23:20
I wonder how the effects of a younger person's blood added to your own compares with blood doping? Athletes do so to get added oxygen exchange, for better performance at athletics. Would added oxygen contribute to what the blood study saw here? Or Iron. Or Copper. Or Magnesium. The list could go on and on. Again I emphasize that DHEA has a lot to do with how you feel.
Comment icon #22 Posted by pallidin on 8 May, 2014, 20:20
I presume this does not work with just "plasma" So, if with red blood cells and such, does there have to be a "type" match or some other medical considerations with the rats?? Just curious...
Comment icon #23 Posted by TheSpoonyOne on 8 May, 2014, 23:38
How so? Because: I hate hearing about these reversing ageing articles that crop up occasionally, curing diseases is fantastic, of course, but spreading hopes of reversing the ageing process, an unnatural and world changing for the worse thing in itself, isn't good for people to hear. It's false hope that can never be achieved, and if it did would cause untold social problems and upheaval.
Comment icon #24 Posted by HappyMonkey on 9 May, 2014, 22:25
Longer lifespanes would have some good as well. Part of the problem with tackling environmental issues is in a lot of cases they have side effcts that take longer to manifest than the average person's life expectancy. It's hard to get people to take them seriously.
Comment icon #25 Posted by Hvashi on 12 May, 2014, 5:21
While it sounds wonderful to have an extended lifespan and to be able to live to see how humanity progresses, I don't see the merit in it for the average person. For an extrasolar astronaut, sure. For a geneticist experimenting on himself, why not? But not for Joe Blow. I think there'd be a psychological toll on the modern day "Methuselah". I think that humanity needs to accept that we are merely mortal. All things in nature die or disintegrate: that goes for mountains, animals, plants, humans and even the seemingly eternal stars above. It's healthier to accept that we must leave this life to ... [More]
Comment icon #26 Posted by Frank Merton on 12 May, 2014, 5:27
I hate hearing about these reversing ageing articles that crop up occasionally, curing diseases is fantastic, of course, but spreading hopes of reversing the ageing process, an unnatural and world changing for the worse thing in itself, isn't good for people to hear. I will admit skepticism and even cynicism about such reports, but your attitude that reversing aging would be "unnatural" and not good for people to hear is to me weird. If such a thing became available of course we would use it, natural or not, and there would be nothing evil in using it -- it would be delaying death.
Comment icon #27 Posted by Frank Merton on 12 May, 2014, 5:30
It's false hope that can never be achieved, and if it did would cause untold social problems and upheaval. Oh I think it can and will be achieved. The fact that each species seems to have a different inherited lifespan and that death seems to have evolved because of disease and predation and is not natural is pretty well understood, which implies that we are programmed to age and die even though we are capable of repairing ourselves.I don't expect it though for a few hundred years. It's complicated and like cancer will not yield to a single thing.


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