Sunday, August 20, 2017
Contact us    |    Advertise    |   Help   RSS icon Twitter icon Facebook icon
    Home  ·  News  ·  Forum  ·  Stories  ·  Image Gallery  ·  Columns  ·  Encyclopedia  ·  Videos
Find: in

Woolly mammoth 'on the verge of resurrection'


Posted on Thursday, 16 February, 2017 | Comment icon 18 comments

Mammoths could roam the Earth again soon. Image Credit: CC BY 2.5 Public Library of Science
Scientists believe that an elephant-mammoth hybrid embryo could be created within as little as two years.
Speaking in advance of this year's American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) meeting, Professor George Church, the scientist leading efforts to achieve the 'de-extinction' of the woolly mammoth, has claimed that success may be only a couple of years away.

His team at Harvard University has been working to create a "mammophant" - a cross between a modern elephant and a mammoth that will possess some of the physical traits of both species.

To achieve this, the researchers are going to splice in the genes associated with certain mammoth traits such as long shaggy hair, subcutaneous fat and blood adapted to cold weather climates.

"We're working on ways to evaluate the impact of all these edits and basically trying to establish embryogenesis in the lab," said Professor Church.

There are even plans to grow the hybrid inside an artificial womb rather than in a surrogate mother, mainly to avoid harming any elephants which are themselves becoming increasingly endangered.

Not everyone however is enthusiastic about what the team is attempting to achieve.

"The proposed 'de-extinction' of mammoths raises a massive ethical issue - the mammoth was not simply a set of genes, it was a social animal, as is the modern Asian elephant," said Matthew Cobb, professor of zoology at the University of Manchester.

"What will happen when the elephant-mammoth hybrid is born ?"

"How will it be greeted by elephants ?"

Source: The Guardian | Comments (18)

Tags: Mammoth, Cloning

Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #9 Posted by White Unicorn on 18 February, 2017, 14:26
I heard about this years ago and it was about gene editing a hybrid but the process would take years of editing out the elephant genes from the hybrids born.
Comment icon #10 Posted by oldrover on 18 February, 2017, 15:23
I think, that was the old idea, before they'd recovered the whole genomes of quite a few extinct species. As an aside, they now have the complete thylacine genome. It's not been formally published onyet though. I'm not claiming any special insight there, I do have a couple of good connections but I learned that from 'Expedition Unkown'.
Comment icon #11 Posted by woopypooky on 19 February, 2017, 5:26
For those people who tried to resurrect dinosaurs and ice age creatures, what's the benefit in doing so?
Comment icon #12 Posted by taniwha on 19 February, 2017, 6:12
Jun11,1993Jurassic Park $63,000,000 $50,159,460 $395,708,305 $1,038,812,584 May22,1997The Lost World: Jurassic Park $75,000,000 $72,132,785 $229,086,679 $618,638,999 Jul18,2001Jurassic Park III $93,000,000 $50,771,645 $181,166,115 $365,900,000 Jun12,2015Jurassic World $215,000,000 $208,806,270 $652,198,010 $1,671,640,59 Jun22,2018Jurassic World Sequel$0$0 Totals $446,000,000$1,458,159,109 $3,694,992,176 Averages $111,500,000 $95,467,540 $364,539,777 $923,748,044 The Benefits of Cloning Dinosaurs
Comment icon #13 Posted by Sundew on 20 February, 2017, 2:07
Well, first of all, you can never tell how such technology might be helpful in the future, say in medicine or gene therapy. Secondly, in the case of certain more modern creatures, like say Stellar's Sea Cow, Passenger Pigeon, Carolina Parakeet, Thylacine and many others, these were wiped out in fairly recent history by man's thoughtlessness. By removing them from their natural habitat, we changed the environment in which they lived. If we could bring them back, we might rectify the damage we have caused. As for dinosaurs, I'm fairly certain without good genetic material, that will not happen ... [More]
Comment icon #14 Posted by Mattstar on 20 February, 2017, 5:11
Our ancestors hunted them and most other species of mega-fauna to extinction. If there's a chance we can undo mistakes of the past, I think we should bring them back! Bring a few back and set up a reserve for them.
Comment icon #15 Posted by Myles on 20 February, 2017, 13:55
From what I have read, humans played a part, but may not have been the biggest reason for their extinction. Disease, lack of fresh water and climate change may have been bigger factors.
Comment icon #16 Posted by MissJatti on 23 February, 2017, 14:31
scientists areso preoccupied with whether or not they could that they didn't stop to think if they should.
Comment icon #17 Posted by oldrover on 23 February, 2017, 17:06
Better to spend the money saving species that are dying out now, before we have to rescue them form beyond extinction. As much as I love thylacines I'd rather see the money spent combating DFTD and saving the quoll.
Comment icon #18 Posted by Sundew on 24 February, 2017, 2:22
I'm sure being two different disciplines, there's room for both ideals and funding for each likely comes from different sources, it's not like one group supports every cause. The quoll is probably more endangered from introduced foxes and cats, whether they will ever be mostly controlled remains to be seen.


Please Login or Register to post a comment.


  On the forums
Forum posts:
Forum topics:
Members:

5970155
256958
168859

 
USS Indianapolis wreck found 70 years on
8-20-2017
The wreckage of a cruiser sank by a Japanese submarine 70 years ago has finally been discovered.
'Apocalyptic' cloud hangs over town in Brazil
8-19-2017
Residents of Teixeira de Freitas were treated to a rather unusual and unnerving spectacle this week.
Mysterious doors appear across Nova Scotia
8-19-2017
The freestanding doors have turned up in several towns, leaving local residents scratching their heads.
Can the Yellowstone supervolcano be stopped ?
8-19-2017
NASA has come up with an ambitious new plan to cool down the supervolcano by using it as an energy source.
Featured Videos
Gallery icon 
The napkin ring problem
Posted 8-20-2017 | 0 comments
Why is it that any two 'napkin rings' cut from any sizes of spherical object will have equal volume ?
 
Why don't we use our parent's names?
Posted 8-19-2017 | 2 comments
Why do we call our parents mom and dad instead of using their actual names ?
 
Adam Savage meets an alien
Posted 8-18-2017 | 2 comments
The former MythBuster checks out the animatronic alien from the movie Alien Covenant.
 
Concrete blocks chest smash
Posted 8-17-2017 | 0 comments
Multiple world record holder Ali Bahcetepe has 16 concrete blocks smashed on his chest.
 
Animal symbiotic relationships
Posted 8-16-2017 | 2 comments
A look at some of the animal species that rely on one another to survive.
 
 View: More videos
Stories & Experiences
A night that I will never forget
8-18-2017 | Massena, NY
 
Shapeshifter
8-18-2017 | Cranbrook British Columbia
 
Ghost experiences ?
8-11-2017 | United States
 
 
 
My real, true experiences
7-26-2017 | New Zealand
 
Incoming call
7-26-2017 | B.T. Collins Park: Folsom, CA
 
Three knocks woke me up twice
7-26-2017 | Virginia
 
Spider signs
7-21-2017 | Michigan
 

         More stories | Send us your story
 
Top   |  Home   |   Forum   |   News   |   Image Gallery   |  Columns   |   Encyclopedia   |   Videos   |   Polls
UM-X 10.7 Unexplained-Mysteries.com 2001-2017
Privacy Policy and Disclaimer   |   Cookies   |   Advertise   |   Contact   |   Help/FAQ