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Science & Technology

Scientists sign deal to clone mammoth

March 14, 2012 | Comment icon 46 comments



Image Credit: Wikimedia Commons
A joint Russian and South Korean research effort has been launched in a bid to create a live mammoth.
Controversial cloning pioneer Hwang Woo-Suk co-signed the agreement with Vasily Vasiliev, the teams will work together in an effort to clone a live mammoth using cells retrieved from specimens found frozen in the Siberian permafrost. "The first and hardest mission is to restore mammoth cells," said researcher Hwang In-Sung. Once cells have been found, the scientists will replace an elephant's egg cell nuclei with those taken from the mammoth's somatic cells.
The deal was signed by Vasily Vasiliev, vice rector of North-Eastern Federal University of the Sakha Republic, and controversial cloning pioneer Hwang Woo-Suk of South Korea's Sooam Biotech Research Foundation.


Source: Telegraph | Comments (46)


Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #37 Posted by Lady Llayne 10 years ago
I will admit, as much as it might be a good idea, the idea of bringing creatures, plants or what ever back to life doesnt seem natural. There are reason beyond our understanding that these things are not on the earth any more, be it man's influence or nature's. At the end of the day, everything makes way for greater things in this life
Comment icon #38 Posted by Anne-Marie 10 years ago
Would an elephant mother be able to carry and birth a mammoth calf though? I have no idea how big a mammoth calf is in comparison to an elephant calf but I'm guessing it'd be quite a difference. I feel sorry for the mother. Also, I remember a few years ago there was a story going around that a human was cloned by this same scientist. Dunno whether it's true though. All in all I personally think scientist may indeed go too far with this. Anyone up for watching Jurrasic Park with me?
Comment icon #39 Posted by Bavarian Raven 10 years ago
Anyone up for watching Jurrasic Park with me? watching? in a few more years time we can VISIT jurassic park
Comment icon #40 Posted by Conrad Clough 10 years ago
Did they learn nothing from Jurassic Park?
Comment icon #41 Posted by Bavarian Raven 10 years ago
Did they learn nothing from Jurassic Park? when mammoths escape, they dont eat the tourists though
Comment icon #42 Posted by DKO 10 years ago
Would an elephant mother be able to carry and birth a mammoth calf though? I have no idea how big a mammoth calf is in comparison to an elephant calf but I'm guessing it'd be quite a difference. I feel sorry for the mother. Also, I remember a few years ago there was a story going around that a human was cloned by this same scientist. Dunno whether it's true though. All in all I personally think scientist may indeed go too far with this. Anyone up for watching Jurrasic Park with me? Mammoths were in fact a little smaller than the modern African Elephant.
Comment icon #43 Posted by Abramelin 10 years ago
Mammoths were in fact a little smaller than the modern African Elephant. Mammuthus sungari, sometimes called the Songhua River mammoth, evolved from smaller Siberian mammoths and lived in northern China during the middle Pleistocene (about 280,000 years ago). It survived until the beginning of the Late Pleistocene. The replica specimen on display at the Ibaraki Nature Museum in Ibaraki, Japan, is 9.1 metres (30 ft) long, 5.3 metres (17 ft) tall, and has an estimated weight of 17 tonnes (19 short tons) slightly smaller than Paraceratherium, the largest known land mammal. The original skeleton... [More]
Comment icon #44 Posted by DKO 10 years ago
Mammuthus sungari, sometimes called the Songhua River mammoth, evolved from smaller Siberian mammoths and lived in northern China during the middle Pleistocene (about 280,000 years ago). It survived until the beginning of the Late Pleistocene. The replica specimen on display at the Ibaraki Nature Museum in Ibaraki, Japan, is 9.1 metres (30 ft) long, 5.3 metres (17 ft) tall, and has an estimated weight of 17 tonnes (19 short tons) slightly smaller than Paraceratherium, the largest known land mammal. The original skeleton is at the Inner Mongolian Museum and it is based on two very large indiv... [More]
Comment icon #45 Posted by Detective Hex 10 years ago
I can see it now, the Mc-Mammoth, coming to Mcdonalds near you.
Comment icon #46 Posted by Insightful Waffles 10 years ago
this isnt good.


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