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Active volcanoes discovered on Venus


Posted on Thursday, 20 March, 2014 | Comment icon 7 comments

Venus's surface has been shaped by volcanism. Image Credit: NASA
Scientists have identified four bright spots on the surface that are believed to be volcanic in nature.
The enigmatic second planet from the Sun possesses a thick atmosphere and a surface that has been forged by rampant volcanism over the course of its history. While evidence of this activity can be found all over the planet, it hasn't been clear to what extent volcanism persists on Venus today.

In an ongoing research project, Alexander Bazilevskiy and colleagues at the Max-Planck Institute for Solar System Research in Germany put together detailed mosaics of the surface from numerous images taken from orbit. By analyzing the relative brightness of the surface they were able to identify four points of light that seemed to indicate that something was still going on.

The team believes that these bright flashes could be the site of extensive lava flows, rows of cinder cones or hotspots of volcanic activity similar to those found on Jupiter's moon Io.

Source: Discovery News | Comments (7)

Tags: Volcano, Venus

Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #1 Posted by SkeptcByMindBelievrByHeart on 20 March, 2014, 19:43
yup, under all that beauty, there is a issue waiting to erupt
Comment icon #2 Posted by Taun on 20 March, 2014, 19:53
As hot as that planet is, a volcano almost seems like a cool spot...
Comment icon #3 Posted by Waspie_Dwarf on 20 March, 2014, 20:04
yup, under all that beauty, there is a issue waiting to erupt Venus beautiful? The mythical goddess may have been. It may even be a pretty sight in the sky, but a planet where the surface temperature melts tin, the pressure is equivalent to that over half a mile down in the ocean, where the wind blow at 220 mph and where the clouds are made of sulphuric acid is not a conventional view of beauty. The (long suspected) active volcanoes only add to Venus seeming more like Hell than Earth's twin planet.
Comment icon #4 Posted by Ryu on 20 March, 2014, 21:57
Strangely I am not surprised to hear of geological activity. Considering the immense pressure and heat on Venus plus the torque it is under being so much closer to the sun and all, I am surprised that volcanic activity wasn't considered a possibility sooner.
Comment icon #5 Posted by coolguy on 21 March, 2014, 4:02
That's cool if these are volcanos awesome find
Comment icon #6 Posted by Rhino666 on 21 March, 2014, 5:02
Nice to know but no one is going there anyway. So why not look at something a little more human friendly!
Comment icon #7 Posted by highdesert50 on 21 March, 2014, 11:47
It's amazing how narrow the goldilocks zone of habitability is at about 0.95 to 0.99 AU from a sun.


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