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5,000-year-old human footprints discovered


Posted on Saturday, 15 November, 2014 | Comment icon 9 comments

The footprints were situated along the coast of Denmark. Image Credit: CC BY-SA 2.0 Harald Hoyer
Two sets of human footprints dating back to the Stone Age have been found on the island of Lolland.
The prints were left by two fisherman who unknowingly created them while wading in the southern Baltic Sea 5,000 years ago.

They were found alongside Stone Age fishing equipment by archaeologists hoping to salvage as many archaeological objects as possible from the dried up inlets of the Danish island before work begins on a new underwater tunnel next year.

The discovery is the first of its kind ever made in the country.
"This is really quite extraordinary, finding footprints from humans," said archaeologist Terje Stafseth. "Normally, what we find is their rubbish in the form of tools and pottery, but here, we suddenly have a completely different type of trace from the past, footprints left by a human being."

The inlets would have been regularly used as fishing grounds in the Stone Age at a time when the water level of the Baltic Sea was rising due to melting glaciers.

The footprints appear to have made as the two fisherman attempted to retrieve something from the sea floor, most likely one of the traps that they used to catch fish known as a 'fishing fence'.

Source: Fox News | Comments (9)


Tags: Footprints, Lolland


Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #1 Posted by pallidin on 15 November, 2014, 18:25
Huh... great find.
Comment icon #2 Posted by Atuke on 15 November, 2014, 18:25
Pretty sweet. I didn't think 5,000 years is too significant though, maybe I'm missing something. Doesn't seem exactly Stone-Age just 5,000 years ago. Unless you're one of the flat-earthers or religious zealots who think the planet is only 6,000 years old. Anyway cool find, I hope they released their fish.
Comment icon #3 Posted by Mikenator on 15 November, 2014, 18:43
Fred and barney!
Comment icon #4 Posted by Aardvark-DK on 15 November, 2014, 21:06
Danes can see anything as a world event...(I am a dane...this is not a world event hehe)
Comment icon #5 Posted by jamesjr191 on 15 November, 2014, 23:55
Awesome!
Comment icon #6 Posted by qxcontinuum on 16 November, 2014, 6:10
So how exactly did they established the foot prints were 5000 years older? Don't say the they establish the substrate to be from that time and therefore assuming everything embedded into it must be from then!
Comment icon #7 Posted by kapow53 on 17 November, 2014, 1:54
These North American prints are interesting too. http://westerndigs.org/oldest-human-footprints-in-north-america-identified/
Comment icon #8 Posted by Likely Guy on 17 November, 2014, 4:55
So how exactly did they established the foot prints were 5000 years older? Don't say the they establish the substrate to be from that time and therefore assuming everything embedded into it must be from then! I'm having trouble accessing the original article, but the one provided by kapow53 says, "Felstead and his team were able to date the tracks because they were preserved in travertine, a sedimentary rock that contains minute traces of uranium from the waters in which it formed. Since uranium decays into the element thorium at predictable rates, the scientists were able to measure the ratio... [More]
Comment icon #9 Posted by Peter B on 17 November, 2014, 9:41
So how exactly did they established the foot prints were 5000 years older? Don't say the they establish the substrate to be from that time and therefore assuming everything embedded into it must be from then! I note that only the headline for the article says "5000 years". The article's author says "about 5000 years" in the first paragraph. But in the guts of the article it says: The Stone Age footprints were likely formed sometime between 5,000 B.C. and 2,000 B.C., Jensen said. At that time, the water level of the Baltic Sea was rising due to melting glaciers in northern Europe. Also at that ... [More]


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