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Palaeontology

Extinct toothless dwarf dolphin unveiled

By T.K. Randall
August 23, 2017 · Comment icon 3 comments


Scientists have identified an extinct species of mini-dolphin that lived over 30 million years ago.
At just over half the size of a bottlenose dolphin, this pint-sized, snub-nosed mammal was identified following the discovery of a fossilized cranium in a river near Charleston, South Carolina.
Known as Inermorostrum xenops, the species was believed to be an early offshoot of a group of cetaceans known as the toothed whales, which also include beaked whales and sperm whales.


"Inermorostrum took only four million years to evolve from ancestral whales with precisely occluding teeth into a toothless, suction feeding specialist," said study author Robert Boessenecker.

Source: Phys.org | Comments (3)


Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #1 Posted by Twin 6 years ago
suction feeding specialist? Oh! The first politicians.
Comment icon #2 Posted by paperdyer 6 years ago
We can all them Hooverus Dophinus.
Comment icon #3 Posted by Boozemonkey 6 years ago
In this world of political correctness surely they should be referred to as dolphins of short stature that are dentally challenged?


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