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SpaceX Falcon Heavy launch is a huge success


Posted on Tuesday, 6 February, 2018 | Comment icon 91 comments

Where no car has gone before. Image Credit: YouTube / SpaceX
The world's most powerful rocket has successfully blasted off in to the heavens on its first test flight.
The Falcon Heavy, which consists of a strengthened Falcon 9 rocket core with two additional Falcon 9 boosters on either side, soared high in to the sky above Cape Canaveral, Florida today after a truly spectacular launch from the historic 39A pad at NASA's Kennedy Space Center.

Not only did the launch itself succeed, but both side boosters came back in to land, side by side, in a highly impressive and controlled descent that saw them touch down within 1,000ft of one another.
The rocket even managed to deliver its payload - Elon Musk's Tesla Roadster - in to space where it was filmed against the backdrop of the Earth with a David Bowie song playing in the background.

The full stream of the event can be viewed below. ( skip to 28:00 for the actual launch )


Source: YouTube / SpaceX | Comments (91)


Tags: SpaceX, Falcon Heavy


Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #82 Posted by internetperson on 13 February, 2018, 12:12
Got a link? That doesn't sound right but I don't know much about this stuff.
Comment icon #83 Posted by Derek Willis on 13 February, 2018, 13:17
What doesn't sound right? That there are many rocket stages in orbit around the Sun? Every probe that travels to a planet, comet etc. needs to be accelerated to beyond Earth's escape velocity using a rocket stage. These stages go into orbit around the Sun. Here is a link to a Wiki page which gives some idea of how many have been launched during the last fifty-odd years. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Solar_System_probes You can count them yourself!
Comment icon #84 Posted by Merc14 on 13 February, 2018, 15:00
Lists of objects in heliocentric orbit  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_artificial_objects_in_heliocentric_orbit
Comment icon #85 Posted by internetperson on 13 February, 2018, 17:35
I think we have the definition of orbit mixed up, that being said I'm looking to learn not argue so exclamation points are not necessary.
Comment icon #86 Posted by Noteverythingisaconspiracy on 13 February, 2018, 17:45
How do you define orbit ? 
Comment icon #87 Posted by Derek Willis on 13 February, 2018, 17:55
I meant no offence: I was simply meaning that if you want to know how many rocket stages, probes, and other human-made objects are in orbit around the Sun, you can count them yourself.
Comment icon #88 Posted by Merc14 on 13 February, 2018, 17:59
If you are looking to learn then you'd tell us how you define orbit because no one knows what you are talking about here.
Comment icon #89 Posted by internetperson on 14 February, 2018, 15:41
No worries. I definitely need to read up on how the rockets work, stages during the flight, etc at some point in time. Most of my knowledge comes from watching Apollo 13. Oh and regarding the orbit thing: Something has to be specifically 'set' in orbit, right? So it didn't make sense to me that rocket stages or probes would consistently drop into orbit solely around the sun. But after checking out mercs link I see how heliocentric is different from what I was thinking. If heliocentric is redundant in this context then my bad.
Comment icon #90 Posted by Derek Willis on 14 February, 2018, 19:21
An orbit is simply the path an object follows under the influence of a gravitational field. We tend to think of orbits as being "closed", as in an ellipse or a circle (which is really just a special case of an ellipse). This is because the word "orbit" is derived from "orb" - ancient people used to think that the Sun, Moon, planets and stars were embedded on a series of moving glass orbs (spheres) all centered on the Earth. There are also "open" orbits, which are parabolic or hyperbolic. Whether an orbit is closed or open depends on the velocity of the object in question, and the strength of t... [More]
Comment icon #91 Posted by Waspie_Dwarf on 11 March, 2018, 9:48
   


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