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Indian rover to seek nuclear fuel on the Moon


Posted on Thursday, 28 June, 2018 | Comment icon 16 comments

The Moon's Helium-3 could be worth a fortune. Image Credit: NASA / Sean Smith
India's upcoming Chandrayaan-2 rover will be attempting to track down a particularly rare and expensive resource.
Known as Helium-3, this non-radioactive isotope of helium could be used in the future to provide vast amounts of clean energy to the whole world through a process known as nuclear fusion.

While it does exist on Earth, it is rare and expensive to mine - even a single ton is worth billions.

India's new rover, which will launch in October, has been designed to search for Helium-3 deposits embedded in the loose, upper layers of the Moon's surface.

If it can be mined and brought back to the Earth, it could power the entire world for centuries.

"The countries which have the capacity to bring that source from the moon to Earth will dictate the process," said K Sivan, chairman of the Indian Space Research Organisation.

"I don't want to be just a part of them, I want to lead them."

Source: Russia Today | Comments (16)

Tags: India, Moon

Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #7 Posted by Waspie_Dwarf on 29 June, 2018, 10:29
Because there are no poor people in the west right? Oh hang on, there are. Funny how people only make this comment when it's about the Indian space programme.  Double standards?
Comment icon #8 Posted by Myles on 29 June, 2018, 11:05
The race is on.
Comment icon #9 Posted by Simpson of kent on 29 June, 2018, 11:14
Good to see our aid money is spent so wisely and may one day be an investment   
Comment icon #10 Posted by clare256 on 29 June, 2018, 14:52
Not really. I remember after the first moon landing (yes I'm that old)...they hadn't even gotten back to earth before people starting b****in about how we could land a man on the moon, put couldn't feed our poor. blah blah blah
Comment icon #11 Posted by Merc14 on 29 June, 2018, 15:58
Some mope posts similar woe-is-me tidbits in many space exploration threads.  They are usually book-ended with another mope posting how we should spend the defense budget on space exploration instead of war and if we have a grand slam of mopes it will all be topped off with a final mope complaining that NASA is hiding things.   I too remember the complaints ringing out with Apollo 11. 
Comment icon #12 Posted by paperdyer on 29 June, 2018, 16:43
OK, what is it about mining this isotope on the Moon rather than Earth going to make it cheaper?  The rare part I get, which probably increases the selling price and not the true cost.  You have to get people and equipment to the Moon, build and maintain dwellings, etc.  Am I missing something or do they hope to find so much of it the cost will be worth it?
Comment icon #13 Posted by paperdyer on 29 June, 2018, 16:47
Well it's probably because of all the late night commercials asking for money for Indian and African starving kids. Heaven forbid you try to raise money to feed the poor kids in your own country, that's the government's job!  We pay taxes don't we! 
Comment icon #14 Posted by Merc14 on 29 June, 2018, 17:47
It is much more plentiful on the Moon due to its lack of an atmosphere.
Comment icon #15 Posted by Merc14 on 29 June, 2018, 17:49
It is much more plentiful on the Moon due to its lack of an atmosphere.
Comment icon #16 Posted by Nzo on 1 July, 2018, 8:38
I wonder how little its going to cost the Indian space agency to send a rover to the moon vs. the other space agencies?


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