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Expedition in 'no doubt' over live thylacines


Posted on Wednesday, 13 November, 2013 | Comment icon 51 comments


A thylacine at Hobart Zoo photographed in 1928. Image Credit: Benjamin A. Sheppard

A team from the Centre for Fortean Zoology is in Tasmania hunting for signs of the 'extinct' thylacine.

Investigators including Dr Chris Clarke and Richard Freeman are now one week in to their two-week expedition in search of evidence that the thylacine, a species that was declared officially extinct in the 1980s, still survives in the wilds of Tasmania.

The team has spoken to several "highly credible" witnesses and even claims to have discovered some feces that could be from one of the elusive creatures. Samples of the droppings have been preserved in alcohol and sent away to be DNA tested to see what animal they belong to.

"If we get the DNA from them, thatíll be interesting," said Freeman. "They are far too big for a Tasmanian devil and it canít be a dog. Why would a dog be so far out there? Itís a very remote area."

Despite nothing conclusive so far, the expedition team is adamant that there is "no doubt" thylacines have survived and that the evidence is just waiting to be found.

"The area is so damn remote, there are so many prey species and we have so many reliable witnesses who know the bush that Iíd say there is a reasonable population of them left," said Freeman. "Iíd say there are more of them around in the world than Javan rhinos."

   
Source: The Guardian | Comments (51)

Tags: Thylacine


 
Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #42 Posted by ZaraKitty on 13 December, 2013, 13:44
Tasmania remains pretty untouched to my memory, forest wise. It's pretty likely there's some animals hiding deep in the forests.
Comment icon #43 Posted by DKO on 27 December, 2013, 15:49
I think people from many countries could say that. I've never seen a wild koala, wombat, wallaby, platypus, echidna, dingo, tassie devil or pretty much any Australian icon. Kangaroos would have to be the only native animal I would see and even that's rare nowadays. Been months since I've seen a kangaroo, been years since I've seen one up close.
Comment icon #44 Posted by Sundew on 15 January, 2014, 4:05
Wildlife, especially species that are hunted, do tend to stay away from people. I live in North America and have only ever seen two wild black bear, and they were terrified of the encounter, so much so I "bearly" got a good look, I basically saw the rump of one as it dove over an embankment. I have seen one bobcat up close and another possible sighting along a highway and they are common, but rather secretive. I suspect there are large areas of Tasmania that people don't frequent, just like there are large areas of N.A. that rarely get visitors. Doesn't mean the Thylacine ... [More]
Comment icon #45 Posted by psyche101 on 17 January, 2014, 5:03
Worth pointing out that with all our bleating about protecting whales, we still keep Dolphins in captivity, when New Zealand outlawed it. WSPA’s New Zealand Country Manager, Bridget Vercoe, says this is fantastic news for dolphins both here and overseas. Many countries around the world already have legislation prohibiting the taking, holding, importing and exporting of dolphins. Adding New Zealand’s name to this growing list will help strengthen public and government opposition worldwide to this cruel practice. The bloody Kiwis did it first, that's not right. I reck... [More]
Comment icon #46 Posted by psyche101 on 17 January, 2014, 5:07
And Kangaroo legs.
Comment icon #47 Posted by psyche101 on 17 January, 2014, 5:18
I am of the belief that it defiantly lived past the extinction date, but for how long would be anyone guess. David Fleay, Wildlife conservations trapped one as late as the mid 50's but it escaped the trap leaving only fur and paw marks, which he could readily identify as Thylacine. Here are some excellent informative links: This one very much fact orientated And this one, which also retells myths and legends. If it is the Queensland footage, then yes, I believe so.
Comment icon #48 Posted by oldrover on 26 May, 2014, 17:35
Comment icon #49 Posted by PersonFromPorlock on 26 May, 2014, 21:18
There are also reports of a remnant population in Papua-New Guinea, which seems like a real possibility.
Comment icon #50 Posted by oldrover on 26 May, 2014, 21:28
Not to me frankly.
Comment icon #51 Posted by Warrior1256 on 27 May, 2014, 23:17
Same here, it would be nice if some were discovered.


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