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Was long-lost Viking settlement in Canada ?


Posted on Monday, 12 March, 2018 | Comment icon 2 comments

Was the settlement of Hop in New Brunswick ? Image Credit: CC BY-SA 4.0 Wolfmann
Known as Hop, the settlement has been spoken of in Norse sagas passed down over hundreds of years.
Archaeologists have long known that the Vikings founded a settlement in North America around 1,000 years ago, several centuries before famed explorer Christopher Columbus - who is frequently credited with discovering the continent - had even been born.

One site known to have been used by these ancient Scandinavian seafarers was L'Anse aux Meadows in Newfoundland, which today is classed as a United Nations World Heritage site.

The whereabouts of Hop, however - a legendary North American Viking settlement famed for its grapes, salmon and canoes made from animal skins - has long remained a mystery.

Now though, by studying Norse texts and archaeological finds on America's east coast, archaeologist and Viking expert Birgitta Wallace believes that she may have finally found the answer.

Hop, she argues, was likely located in the Miramichi-Chaleur Bay area of New Brunswick, Canada.

This particular location fits perfectly, both with historic descriptions of Hop and with the availability of the wild resources, such as grapes and salmon, that the settlement was known for.

The idea that Hop was only a single site however may be incorrect, as Wallace believes that the name may have referred to several short-term settlements in the area that changed each year.

Given that most of these potential settlement sites are now paved over however, it may be very difficult to prove once and for all that Hop really did exist at this location.

Source: Independent | Comments (2)

Tags: Viking, Hop

Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #1 Posted by Piney on 12 March, 2018, 19:23
Maybe. It was small so evidence will be hard to find.
Comment icon #2 Posted by Bavarian Raven on 13 March, 2018, 21:54
Not surprising - this has been put forwards before (that area, anyways). In one of the sagas, the length of daylight at the height of the winter solstice was recorded. And using that as a guide, it denotes that the settlement of Hop was located in the region of newbrunswick. Nevertheless, neat article.


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