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World's oldest known alligator is in his 80s


Posted on Monday, 20 August, 2018 | Comment icon 14 comments

In alligator years, Muja is positively ancient. Image Credit: CC BY-SA 3.0 Novik A.H.
An alligator named Muja, who lives in Belgrade Zoo, is considered to be the oldest alligator in captivity.
Having remained a popular visitor attraction at the Serbian zoo for more than eight decades, Muja was originally brought to the country from Germany as an adult just before World War II began.

Although there is no official record of his precise date of birth, the fact that he has remained at the zoo since 1937 means that he must be at least 81 years old and is quite possibly much older than that.
Aside from a bout of gangrene which resulted in him losing his front right claw in 2012, he is still regarded as relatively healthy and has a good appetite, especially for his age.

"He is well... and healthy, eats well and is in good form for his age, so we hope that he'll remain that way for many years," said zoo director Srboljub Aleksic.


Source: Huffington Post | Comments (14)


Tags: Alligator, Muja


Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #5 Posted by DanL on 23 August, 2018, 0:51
I was raised swimming with alligators and have never known anyone to have a problem with them here. I think that over the many years here in East Texas any alligators that acted aggressive got killed so that eventually they evolved into rather shy and non aggressive subspecies. It is common to see an alligator of substantial size swimming just outside of the swimming area at the state park here. It gives the kids a thrill but has never resulted in any sort of a problem.
Comment icon #6 Posted by ETXKiowa on 23 August, 2018, 2:39
Misleading headline.  Should read "Oldest Captive Alligator".   In 2014, Rupert, the world's oldest known animal (500 years) was killed after escaping a sanctuary near Vicksburg, MS.  http://www.moron.com/500-year-old-alligator-killed/  ......   I would imagine somewhere from DFW to the east coast there is more than likely a few more ancient alligators.  Nonetheless, the Belgrade zoo and the one in SA should be proud of their (young) captive alligators.
Comment icon #7 Posted by taniwha on 23 August, 2018, 10:19
This is sad.. www.google.co.nz/amp/s/abcnews.go.com/amp/US/victim-dies-apparent-alligator-attack-hilton-head-island/story%3fid=57286335
Comment icon #8 Posted by Saru on 23 August, 2018, 10:21
The headline is "Oldest known alligator" - it doesn't discount the possibility that there older ones out there somewhere. How could they have known it was 500 years old ? There would need to be records dating back to the 16th century.
Comment icon #9 Posted by Still Waters on 23 August, 2018, 10:26
We have a thread about that. It's here: https://www.unexplained-mysteries.com/forum/topic/320783-alligator-attacks-and-kills-woman/
Comment icon #10 Posted by ETXKiowa on 25 August, 2018, 7:04
Skeletochronology
Comment icon #11 Posted by Saru on 25 August, 2018, 9:08
Is there any record of such an analysis being carried out on this particular animal ? In fact, are there are any other sources at all claiming that Rupert is 500 years old ? I can only find the one you linked to and it doesn't seem that credible.
Comment icon #12 Posted by Hawken on 27 August, 2018, 6:02
This gator was in the news last year.  
Comment icon #13 Posted by openozy on 27 August, 2018, 8:09
Alligators are the marsh mellows of crocodilia compared to Aussie salt water crocs,who can kill just by looking at you 
Comment icon #14 Posted by Hawken on 27 August, 2018, 16:43
I don't know. Going near a bluejay nest with young can be quite hazardous..


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