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Mars orbiter repositioned for rover landing


Posted on Thursday, 26 July, 2012 | Comment icon 14 comments | News tip by: Waspie_Dwarf


Image credit: NASA

 
The Mars Odyssey spacecraft has been repositioned ahead of August's Curiosity rover landing.

This change has been made to help NASA communicate with the rover as it attempts one of the most ambitious landing sequences ever undertaken. As the Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft reaches Mars the Earth will set below the Martian horizon, breaking the direct line of communication - by repositioning the Odyssey spacecraft in orbit around the planet it will be possible to maintain contact through a different, indirect route.

Confirmation that the rover has landed safely on the surface of Mars is currently expected to arrive at around 10:31pm PDT on August 5th.

"NASA's Mars Odyssey spacecraft has successfully adjusted its orbital location to be in a better position to provide prompt confirmation of the August landing of the Curiosity rover."

  View: Full article |  Source: NASA

  Discuss: View comments (14)

   


 
Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #5 Posted by Imaginarynumber1 on 26 July, 2012, 7:59
I cannot wait for this baby to land and get some science started!
Comment icon #6 Posted by Timonthy on 26 July, 2012, 10:34
C'MON BABY! YOU CAN DO IT!
Comment icon #7 Posted by Junior Chubb on 26 July, 2012, 13:04
Well if positive thought helped, you guys have helped ensure success... Oh what the hell, come on baby bring home the bacon!!
Comment icon #8 Posted by Hazzard on 26 July, 2012, 15:41
7 minutes of terror comming up,... hold on to your hats people.
Comment icon #9 Posted by MadMike740 on 26 July, 2012, 15:48
Comment icon #10 Posted by healeybhoy on 26 July, 2012, 18:29
Fingers crossed all goes well
Comment icon #11 Posted by Waspie_Dwarf on 26 July, 2012, 18:55
Couldn't agree more, They took a big gamble in the landing system I would disagree that they are taking a gamble. What they are doing is pushing the boundary. Curiosity is just too large for the parachute and airbag system which has worked so well in the past. That leaves a controlled descent by rocket. A lander would require heavy duty landing legs, which would add weight. The skycrane is a logical solution to the problem. It is also a work of genius.
Comment icon #12 Posted by highdesert50 on 26 July, 2012, 19:12
I would like to see unmanned exploration move forward and even manned ones. With the population on this planet growing in leaps and bounds we may need the resources of other worlds to sustain life on this one. Absolutely agree. The success of a civilization will be in its ability to successfully populate another planet simply because at some time in the future a doomsday event will occur on this planet.
Comment icon #13 Posted by Sundew on 26 July, 2012, 21:52
Well, with any luck the rover will not only land but discover microbial life in its travels. Let's just not bring any back to earth quite yet. I've watched enough sci-fi movies to know this is NEVER a good idea, lol!
Comment icon #14 Posted by csspwns on 27 July, 2012, 1:54
but the microbial life might be similar to earths so it wont be tat exciting. if the rover finds like intelligent life tat could walk talk eat read those things tat would be rlly exciting


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