Saturday, February 24, 2018
Contact us    |    Advertise    |   Help   RSS icon Twitter icon Facebook icon
    Home  ·  News  ·  Forum  ·  Stories  ·  Image Gallery  ·  Columns  ·  Encyclopedia  ·  Videos
Find: in

Scientists create fluid with 'negative mass'


Posted on Tuesday, 18 April, 2017 | Comment icon 16 comments

How can something have negative mass ? Image Credit: CC BY 2.0 Jose Manuel Suarez
Created at Washington State University, the bizarre fluid defies Isaac Newton's Second Law of Motion.
The idea that something can have negative mass is difficult to comprehend. Push it, and instead of moving away from you it will accelerate towards you in apparent defiance of the laws of physics.

To create this negative mass liquid, the researchers used lasers to cool rubidium atoms down to a temperature only slightly higher than absolute zero.

This created something known as a Bose-Einstein condensate - a form of matter in which particles move extremely slowly and behave like waves.

"What's a first here is the exquisite control we have over the nature of this negative mass, without any other complications," said Michael Forbes, an assistant professor of physics and astronomy.

"It provides another environment to study a fundamental phenomenon that is very peculiar."

Source: Phys.org | Comments (16)

Tags: Negative Mass

Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #7 Posted by Calibeliever on 18 April, 2017, 17:26
So, it's a cat.
Comment icon #8 Posted by seanjo on 18 April, 2017, 18:25
Surely that's, floating all around the place!
Comment icon #9 Posted by Rolci on 18 April, 2017, 19:05
Reminds me of when they created stuff at negative absolute temperature. Negative mass sounds more palpable to me. Also EB condensate is nothing new.
Comment icon #10 Posted by Parsec on 18 April, 2017, 21:07
So, if according to Newton's second law the condensate goes towards the force pushing it, what happens according to the third? Does it "swallow" the pushing force?  Theoretically it should pull towards itself. 
Comment icon #11 Posted by sepulchrave on 19 April, 2017, 1:36
The third law should continue to hold normally, meaning the condensate creates an equal and opposite force. This means if the original force was created by a positive mass, the force should push it away from the negative mass. As the force on the negative mass pushes it towards the positive mass, this leads to a condition dubbed ``runaway motion''. Although it seems physically implausible, it is theoretically feasible as the total energy, momentum, etc. of the system is conserved. Wikipedia has a nice article on the subject, as usual. In the context of the experiment described above, it is imp... [More]
Comment icon #12 Posted by Krater on 19 April, 2017, 2:13
Negative mass? Ha!  Yeah, and I just farted an inverted Möbius strip.
Comment icon #13 Posted by Parsec on 19 April, 2017, 20:44
Thank you sepulchrave, your explanations are always appreciated. That is so super cool! While reading the article you linked, I thought "well, we could use it for a spaceship" and a second later I read that Forward of course already proposed it. Well, nomen est omen.    Question: I get the runaway motion, but that is solely based on gravitational interactions.  If instead for instance we apply a force to the negative mass, greater than the gravitational force, are you sure about the third law?  I'm possibly confused, but if normally according to the third law F(a) = -F(b), written also as m(a)... [More]
Comment icon #14 Posted by sepulchrave on 20 April, 2017, 0:39
The argument is based on gravitational interactions because that is a non-contact force that applies to large objects. And yes, both forces should have the same direction - that is how we get runaway motion. One object pushes the other, the other pulls the first. It is difficult to apply a force other than gravity to this situation without introducing additional complexities. Electrostatic or magnetic forces can result in charge distribution within the objects, changing the forces; while contact forces (which are essentially electrostatic as well) are very difficult to model mathematically. Th... [More]
Comment icon #15 Posted by taniwha on 20 April, 2017, 11:35
I want to see some anti gravity applications resulting from this.
Comment icon #16 Posted by Sundew on 22 April, 2017, 2:39
One of the best lines in that movie: when the Emperor says, "Bring in that floating fat man, the Baron."  I wonder if true anti-gravity could ever become a reality and what that would mean for travel and other means of transportation? 


Please Login or Register to post a comment.


  On the forums
Inflatable space hotel could launch by 2021
2-23-2018
Tourists may soon have the opportunity to book a room in a hotel with a rather extraordinary view.
Neanderthals created oldest known cave art
2-23-2018
A new study has found that Neanderthals, not humans, created the world's oldest known cave paintings.
CT scans reveal baby thylacines for first time
2-22-2018
Scientists have used modern scanning techniques to discover what thylacine infants really looked like.
Transplant patient ends up with two hearts
2-22-2018
A man in India unexpectedly underwent a rare operation that has left him with two working, beating hearts.
Featured Videos
Gallery icon 
The real story of Galileo
Posted 2-20-2018 | 0 comments
Exactly why was legendary astronomer Galileo Galilei convicted of heresy ?
 
Big Bang vs Big Bounce
Posted 2-16-2018 | 0 comments
Was there another universe here before our own universe came in to existence ?
 
The Leaning Tower of Lire
Posted 2-12-2018 | 0 comments
Vsauce returns with a thought-provoking video about the problem of stacking blocks.
 
How did the dinosaurs die ?
Posted 2-8-2018 | 1 comment
A look at the devastating events that preceded the extinction of the dinosaurs.
 
World's longest bicycle
Posted 2-5-2018 | 2 comments
This ridiculous bicycle measures 41.42 meters in length and took nine months to put together.
 
 View: More videos
Stories & Experiences
 
Black hole in Bismarck
2-14-2018 | Mandan
 
 
Trapped and chased
2-9-2018 | Saskatchewan canada
 
Someone calling my name
2-9-2018 | Budd Lake NJ
 
Strange feeling
1-18-2018 | Different places
 
Unexplained voices
1-18-2018 | United States
 
First college apartment
12-31-2017 | Daytona Beach, FL
 
The night my niece was murdered
12-19-2017 | Delhi, Louisiana
 
Mysterious Headlights
12-10-2017 | Morgan County, Alabama
 

         More stories | Send us your story
 
Top   |  Home   |   Forum   |   News   |   Image Gallery   |  Columns   |   Encyclopedia   |   Videos   |   Polls
UM-X 10.7 Unexplained-Mysteries.com © 2001-2017
Privacy Policy and Disclaimer   |   Cookies   |   Advertise   |   Contact   |   Help/FAQ