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Space & Astronomy

First ever image of a newborn planet revealed

July 2, 2018 | Comment icon 5 comments



The planet is the glowing orange shape to the right of the black circle. Image Credit: ESO/A Muller et al
Astronomers at the European Southern Observatory have photographed a planet forming around a star.
The remarkable image, which was taken by the ESO's Very Large Telescope, shows a planet larger than Jupiter forming around the star PDS70 at a distance of 370 light years from the Earth.

The black circle in the center is a filter used to block some of the light from the star.

The newborn world appears to have a cloudy atmosphere and has a surface temperature of 1000C.

"These discs around young stars are the birthplaces of planets, but so far only a handful of observations have detected hints of baby planets in them," said study author Miriam Keppler.
"The problem is that until now, most of these planet candidates could just have been features in the disc. The advantage of our detection is that we have detected [the new planet] with several different observing instruments, different filter bands and different years."

It is believed that additional planets could show up around the star over time.

"This is a relatively young star that shows all of the indications that there should be a planet there, and there is one," said astrophysicist Dr Zoe Leinhardt.

"For astronomers, most of the time, it is very rare that we are really able to show a picture."

Source: The Guardian | Comments (5)


Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #1 Posted by Merc14 4 years ago
This is awesome!  First direct evidence of a planet forming in the disc around a star.  Although it looks close to the star in the image it is actually at about the same distance as Uranus is from our Sun.
Comment icon #2 Posted by bison 4 years ago
Yes, given the small size of the star, and the substantial distance of the planet from it, it appears that much of the high heat observed (1000 degree C.) is due to the impact of material that is falling onto the planet. We're told that Earth began in a hot state, too, caused by roughly the same process. 
Comment icon #3 Posted by paperdyer 4 years ago
Here's a link to another article.  
Comment icon #4 Posted by paperdyer 4 years ago
I just thought of this, was there any evidence of a big or small bang?
Comment icon #5 Posted by Waspie_Dwarf 4 years ago
What kind of a bang? Planets and stars form fromthe collapse of a nebula, there is no bang directly involved  (although shock waves from a nearby supernova are believed to be one of the triggers for the collapse of a nebula to begin with).


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