Thursday, January 19, 2017
Contact us    |    Advertise    |   Help   RSS icon Twitter icon Facebook icon
    Home  ·  News  ·  Forum  ·  Stories  ·  Image Gallery  ·  Columns  ·  Encyclopedia  ·  Videos
Find: in

'Extinct' tortoise might not be lost yet


Posted on Friday, 23 November, 2012 | Comment icon 10 comments | News tip by: Still Waters


Image credit: CC 2.0 putneymark

 
Pinta Island giant tortoise 'Lonesome George' was thought to be the last of his species, but was he ?

When George died back in June it was thought that his species had gone extinct, however now it appears that there could be as many as 17 more tortoises on the Galapagos Islands which may share the same genetic traits or genus. A spokesman for the Galapagos National Park issue a statement which iterated that George's death "does not represent the end of the Chelonoidis abingdonii species of Pinta Island giant tortoises."

So could it be that Lonesome George wasn't quite as lonesome as believed ? While it isn't conclusive, there is a chance that other pure Pinta Island tortoises could still be out there. If this turns out to be true then it represents one final opportunity to breed the species before it really does disappear for good.

"When Lonesome George, the last Pinta Island giant tortoise, died in June in the Galapagos, the world mourned the demise of a species - but a new report says the reptile was not so lonely after all."

  View: Full article |  Source: Telegraph

  Discuss: View comments (10)

   


 
Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #1 Posted by Simbi Laveau on 22 November, 2012, 14:36
\(^o^)/
Comment icon #2 Posted by Mnemonix on 22 November, 2012, 14:37
Great. Now what about the Tasmanian Tiger? Those are still alive too, aren't they?
Comment icon #3 Posted by C235 on 23 November, 2012, 12:08
Did they asked him??
Comment icon #4 Posted by Timonthy on 23 November, 2012, 14:16
I'm pretty sure George was lonely.
Comment icon #5 Posted by King Fluffs on 23 November, 2012, 18:55
I certainly hope not. I've always wanted to ride one of them into battle. :-P
Comment icon #6 Posted by Mnemonix on 23 November, 2012, 19:11
I certainly hope not. I've always wanted to ride one of them into battle. :-P ...very slowly.
Comment icon #7 Posted by Hilander on 24 November, 2012, 0:08
Love the big guys, hope he wasn't the last one.
Comment icon #8 Posted by DKO on 24 November, 2012, 0:30
Great. Now what about the Tasmanian Tiger? Those are still alive too, aren't they? I wish haha. The footage of them seems to show they were a playful sort of animal.
Comment icon #9 Posted by thewild on 3 December, 2012, 14:24
what a beautiful animal, these tortises. Tortii. What is the plural?
Comment icon #10 Posted by Abramelin on 3 December, 2012, 19:24
Love the big guys, hope he wasn't the last one. That's what the thread is about, lol. Anyway, he may not have been the last of his kind, but like Timonthy said, he must have felt lonely. Imagine: you live out your years on a speck in the ocean, thinking there is no one else of your kind left, not knowing on some other islands your kind is 'having a ball'.


Please Login or Register to post a comment.


  On the forums
Forum posts:
Forum topics:
Members:

5855843
264570
165116

 
60% of primate species are facing extinction
1-18-2017
A worrying new study has shown just how vulnerable many of the world's primate species actually are.
CIA uploads millions of declassified files
1-18-2017
The documents cover everything from UFO sightings to government-backed remote viewing experiments.
Curiosity discovers metallic meteorite on Mars
1-18-2017
The rover has come across what scientists believe to be an iron-nickel meteorite on the Martian surface.
New video reveals Huygens' harrowing descent
1-17-2017
NASA has released a new video recreating the Huygens probe's historic touchdown on Saturn's moon Titan.
Other news in this category
60% of primate species are facing extinction
Posted 1-18-2017 | 2 comments
A worrying new study has shown just how vulnerable many of the world's primate species actually are....
 
Giant alligator goes for a stroll in Florida
Posted 1-17-2017 | 46 comments
A huge alligator was filmed by tourists at the Circle B Bar Reserve in Polk County, Florida this week....
 
Rain brings alien-like shrimp back to life
Posted 1-16-2017 | 15 comments
A prehistoric species of shrimp in Australia has been emerging from the ground recently due to heavy rain....
 
Live ruby seadragon is spotted in the wild
Posted 1-14-2017 | 14 comments
This rare and fascinating sea creature has been filmed for the first time off the coast of Australia....
 
Vampire bats now have taste for human blood
Posted 1-13-2017 | 16 comments
Researchers in Brazil have warned that some vampire bat populations have started targeting humans....
 
China's 'Star Wars gibbon' is a new species
Posted 1-11-2017 | 3 comments
Scientists have discovered an entirely new species of primate in a remote Chinese rainforest....
 
Elephant picks up tortilla without breaking it
Posted 1-9-2017 | 2 comments
A new experiment has revealed just how gently the world's largest land animal can pick things up....
 
The cheetah is now at risk of going extinct
Posted 12-27-2016 | 47 comments
Conservationists have warned that the world's fastest land animal is on the verge of being wiped out....
 
Snow has been falling in the Sahara Desert
Posted 12-22-2016 | 34 comments
The unexpected flurry is the first to have been reported in the region for almost four decades....
 
163 new species discovered in Mekong region
Posted 12-19-2016 | 3 comments
Researchers have identified a large number of new flora and fauna in the Mekong River basin....
 
Thousands of fish wash up on Cornwall beach
Posted 12-19-2016 | 12 comments
Vast quantities of mackerel and pilchard have washed up along the shore for the second time this month....
 

 View: More news in this category
 
Top   |  Home   |   Forum   |   News   |   Image Gallery   |  Columns   |   Encyclopedia   |   Videos   |   Polls
UM-X 10.7 Unexplained-Mysteries.com © 2001-2017
Privacy Policy and Disclaimer   |   Cookies   |   Advertise   |   Contact   |   Help/FAQ