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World's oldest flowing water discovered


Posted on Friday, 17 May, 2013 | Comment icon 34 comments | News tip by: Still Waters


Image credit: CC 3.0 Arild Vagen

 
An isolated reservoir untouched for up to 2.64 billion years has been found at a mine in Ontario.

The water has been cut off for so long that it dates back to when the first multicellular life appeared on Earth. Rich in dissolved gases the reservoir is located deep underground and could potentially play host to primitive microbial life. If this turns out to be the case then it could mean that water trapped deep beneath the surface of other planets could also prove hospitable.

"What we can be sure of is that we have identified a way in which planets can create and preserve an environment friendly to microbial life for billions of years," said geochemist Greg Holland. "This is regardless of how inhospitable the surface might be, opening up the possibility of similar environments in the subsurface of Mars."

"Water found in a deep, isolated reservoir in Timmins, Ont."

  View: Full article |  Source: CBC.ca

  Discuss: View comments (34)

   


 
Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #25 Posted by Setton on 21 May, 2013, 23:09
You clearly don't have any grasp on the concept of hydrogeology and how to apply it to large groundwater problems. Riight... Obviously four years at one of the top universities in the country studying precisely that, wouldn't teach any of that I refer you to my earlier question, just where did you study? The oxidation of pyrite, for example, at the end of the day is releasing H+ INTO THE WATER that that then lowers pH and maintains the solubility of ferric iron. There is no magical transformation of the entire discharge, it is simply highly concentrated and highly contaminated. And where did I... [More]
Comment icon #26 Posted by goodgodno on 21 May, 2013, 23:13
Riight... Obviously four years at one of the top universities in the country studying precisely that, wouldn't teach any of that I refer you to my earlier question, just where did you study? And where did I say there was a transformation of the entire discharge? I said that water is created and destroyed constantly. Water is H2O. If you change H2O into anything else, even just one molecule, some water is destroyed. The reverse is also true. Again, not what I said. I imagine you're going to have an easy time arguing this if you just invent parts of the conversation. I said 'people like me'. I.e... [More]
Comment icon #27 Posted by Setton on 22 May, 2013, 12:54
Honestly, kid, I haven't got time for this. If you want to learn more, find some work experience. And yet you had time to jump in before... Interesting that you don't when someone asks hard questions. Well, enjoy screwing up the planet. See if you can learn some chemistry while you're there.
Comment icon #28 Posted by goodgodno on 22 May, 2013, 20:09
I would be happy to find time to talk to someone in a civilised manner and to share some of the details from our current projects. Unfortunately, you feel the need to not only to prove a point with a somewhat aggressive overtone but also to insult me and attempt to belittle my education. So no, I haven't got time for a kid who clearly has got a lot of growing up to do. And also, don't come out with the line "I go to one of the top universities"... that really doesn't sit well with people, it will be hard enough for you to get a job in this economic climate as it is.
Comment icon #29 Posted by Setton on 22 May, 2013, 20:17
I would be happy to find time to talk to someone in a civilised manner and to share some of the details from our current projects. Unfortunately, you feel the need to not only to prove a point with a somewhat aggressive overtone but also to insult me and attempt to belittle my education. So no, I haven't got time for a kid who clearly has got a lot of growing up to do. And also, don't come out with the line "I go to one of the top universities"... that really doesn't sit well with people, it will be hard enough for you to get a job in this economic climate as it is. Given that your opening lin... [More]
Comment icon #30 Posted by goodgodno on 22 May, 2013, 20:33
The teaching seems very different to Durham?? You got that from our conversation? Ok, so not only did I study geology and hydrogeology (I don't really think environmental geoscience is a fair comparison, unless your integrated masters is more related) but most of what I have discussed has come directly from my working experience in Australia, the middle east, Europe and the UK. It is converstations like this I realise I am just speaking to a student. I went to Birmingham University if you must know. Pretty prestigious, however I have the life experience to realise that there is more to just a ... [More]
Comment icon #31 Posted by Setton on 22 May, 2013, 21:09
The teaching seems very different to Durham?? You got that from our conversation? Ok, so not only did I study geology and hydrogeology (I don't really think environmental geoscience is a fair comparison, unless your integrated masters is more related) Perhaps if you looked into what environmental geoscience is, you'd understand the comparison. Effectively, it's the same as Durham's geology course but with less focus on structural geology and mineralogy and more focus on hydrology, chemistry and pollution. My entire dissertation was related to water systems and the chemistry of them. The master... [More]
Comment icon #32 Posted by goodgodno on 22 May, 2013, 21:45
Unfortunately for you, an understanding of structural geology is critical to hydrogeology. Particuarly in mining environments since most mineralisation of ore is enriched with the aid of fluid flow through fractures. Rarely does a mine present itself with a homogenous porous aquifer, unless your dealing with commodities such as Uranium sandstone deposts which have formed in palaeochannels, or boring quaries. Well done on the "12x" statement, it just goes to show how much growing up you have to do, I guess you missed my masters in hydrogeology when summing that up. I agreed with you, scientific... [More]
Comment icon #33 Posted by Setton on 22 May, 2013, 21:55
Unfortunately for you, an understanding of structural geology is critical to hydrogeology. Particuarly in mining environments since most mineralisation of ore is enriched with the aid of fluid flow through fractures. Rarely does a mine present itself with a homogenous porous aquifer, unless your dealing with commodities such as Uranium sandstone deposts which have formed in palaeochannels, or boring quaries. Well done on the "12x" statement, it just goes to show how much growing up you have to do, I guess you missed my masters in hydrogeology when summing that up. As you plainly missed my mast... [More]
Comment icon #34 Posted by alibongo on 23 May, 2013, 21:41
I've got a diploma in Swimming, so you can't tell me anything about water!


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