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Lost tomb of Egypt's King Seneb discovered


Posted on Thursday, 16 January, 2014 | Comment icon 35 comments

What secrets still remain buried under the sand ? Image Credit: CC BY-SA 2.0 Axel Seedorff
The pharaoh is believed to have enjoyed the longest rule of his time more than 3,600 years ago.
The tomb, which dates back to 1650 BC, was found near the city of Sohag around 300 miles to the south of Cairo. The pharaoh's skeleton was found intact within a wooden sarcophagus but looters are believed to have taken most of the other items of value long ago.

Thought to have ruled at the beginning of the 13th Paranoiac dynasty, King Seneb Kay led his people for more than four-and-a-half years. Archaeologists were able to decipher hieroglyphics inscribed on the walls to learn who the tomb had belonged to.

"This adds to our pharaonic history, and sheds light on an era about which we knew very little previously," said Head of Antiquities Ali al-Asfar. "He was originally mummified but his body was pulled apart by ancient tomb robbers."

The tomb's discovery follows that of an ancient Egyptian brewer that was discovered on the west bank of the Nile earlier this month.

Source: IB Times | Comments (35)

Tags: Egypt, Pharaoh, King Seneb

Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #26 Posted by kmt_sesh on 21 January, 2014, 22:35
Thanks for that. In the Pyramids and Hieroglyphs book does he give any information for the 14th dynasty as he pretty well skips it in "The Complete Royal Families..."? cormac I just checked and he skips it there, too. In fact, now that you mentioned it, I recall having to turn elsewhere for Dynasty 14 for my own timeline. It contains only one king, Nehesy, and is specific to the Eastern Delta. I'm not certain but perhaps Dodson doesn't even recognize it as a dynasty. This is the case for Dynasty 7 in Toby Wilkinson's The Rise and Fall of Ancient Egypt, in which Wilkinson states this dynasty di... [More]
Comment icon #27 Posted by kmt_sesh on 21 January, 2014, 22:38
Is it really much different than what these archaeologists are doing now? I know it is because of the reasons, but when broken down, it's not so different. LOL To a point this is true, and I often mention it to people at the museum. Ancient Egyptians would've viewed archaeologists, curators, other museum staff, and museum visitors as tomb robbers. And tomb robbers did not meet with pretty ends. But you can spin it, of course. Archaeologists excavate to save ancient artifacts and study them to learn more about ancient societies. On the other end, museum visitors are educated by what it put on d... [More]
Comment icon #28 Posted by Myles on 21 January, 2014, 23:02
LOL To a point this is true, and I often mention it to people at the museum. Ancient Egyptians would've viewed archaeologists, curators, other museum staff, and museum visitors as tomb robbers. And tomb robbers did not meet with pretty ends. But you can spin it, of course. Archaeologists excavate to save ancient artifacts and study them to learn more about ancient societies. On the other end, museum visitors are educated by what it put on display. Isn't that a nice spin? I agree. A good debater could win the arguement no matter which side they take. Don't most archaeologists benefit from "grav... [More]
Comment icon #29 Posted by scorpiosonic on 23 January, 2014, 17:23
I just checked and he skips it there, too. In fact, now that you mentioned it, I recall having to turn elsewhere for Dynasty 14 for my own timeline. It contains only one king, Nehesy, and is specific to the Eastern Delta. I'm not certain but perhaps Dodson doesn't even recognize it as a dynasty. This is the case for Dynasty 7 in Toby Wilkinson's The Rise and Fall of Ancient Egypt, in which Wilkinson states this dynasty didn't even exist. At least I think it was Dynasty 7. Dynasty 8, perhaps? The webmaster @ site I mentioned said no real, (verifiable) info is available for Dynasty 14, (and 16) ... [More]
Comment icon #30 Posted by scorpiosonic on 23 January, 2014, 18:25
Reading Pre and early Dynastic now, if interested see:http://xoomer.virgilio.it/francescoraf/index.htm
Comment icon #31 Posted by kmt_sesh on 24 January, 2014, 3:25
To scorpiosonic's point about the webmaster and his (her?) hesitancy to elaborate on certain dynasties, for many of the minor kings of the intermediate periods there is extremely little in the way of evidence. For our Senebkay of Dynasty 13, as an example, someone of this name was only theoretical in the past and only because a fragment of his titulary exists on the Turin papyrus. In another example, I can't recall the name of the king off the top of my head, but the only evidence for him is a single, crudely produced stela bearing his name and title. It's important to remember that the very w... [More]
Comment icon #32 Posted by scorpiosonic on 24 January, 2014, 4:24
Agreed, and many opinions exist on how to interpret Hieroglyphs, esp the very early symbols. Also, some Archaeologists do label (some of) them chiefs ruling chiefdoms, probably more accurate in PreDynastic Era.
Comment icon #33 Posted by kmt_sesh on 25 January, 2014, 4:10
Agreed, and many opinions exist on how to interpret Hieroglyphs, esp the very early symbols. Also, some Archaeologists do label (some of) them chiefs ruling chiefdoms, probably more accurate in PreDynastic Era. Opinions are one thing but Egyptian hieroglyphs are well understood. Linguists still quibble over fussy parts of speech but the language and its s have been largely (not completely) deciphered. My own training is in Middle Egyptian, which is what most college students learn when pursuing degrees in ancient Near Eastern studies or Egyptology. When you have a command of this stage of the ... [More]
Comment icon #34 Posted by kmt_sesh on 25 January, 2014, 4:12
LOL I just reread my post and see that my opening sentence sounds a bit b****y. That's not how I meant it to seem but I'll let it be.
Comment icon #35 Posted by scorpiosonic on 25 January, 2014, 5:52
No apology necessary, every bit helps. I've read most of your blog and some posts here, and envy your ability to read/understand the glyphs. (I was thinking this thread was dead, and the forum is slow.) "As for the earliest periods, I agree the inions can be tricky...... It's mostly the hieroglyphs from prehistory, and specifically from Tomb Uj at Abydos, over which there is still a lot of debate. Dating to around 3300 BCE, these are the oldest-known hieroglyphs and there is still no universal agreement on their interpretation. I don't consider myself equipped to translate them....." I've had ... [More]


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