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Cryptozoology

19th century Yowie encounter revealed

December 11, 2014 | Comment icon 28 comments



The Australian bush is said to be home to the enigmatic Yowie. Image Credit: Redlands597198
Amateur naturalist Henry James McCooey witnessed the creature near Australia's Batemans Bay in 1882.
While the Patterson-Gimlin footage is often attributed with kick-starting the modern Bigfoot phenomenon, it was by no means the earliest known sighting. Stories of large, hairy hominids have been reported for hundreds of years in countries all over the world including Russia, China and Australia.

One particularly tantalizing tale comes courtesy of Henry James McCooey who detailed his unusual encounter with such a creature in bushland between Batemans Bay and Ulladulla in 1882.

"When I first beheld the animal it was standing on its hind legs, partly upright, looking up at the birds above it in the bushes, blinking its eyes and distorting its visage and making a low chattering kind of noise," he wrote following the encounter.
"If it were standing perfectly upright it would be nearly 5ft high. It was tailless and covered with very long black hair, which was of a dirty red or snuff-colour about the throat and breast."

McCooey went on to describe how the creature's limbs seemed to be strangely out of proportion, that he judged its weight to be around 8 stone and that it appeared to possess 'prodigious' strength.

"Having sufficiently satisfied my curiosity, I throw a stone at the animal, whereupon it immediately rushed off, followed by the birds, and disappeared in a ravine which was close at hand," he wrote.

Source: ABC.net.au | Comments (28)



Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #19 Posted by GrimmOne 7 years ago
Orangutans don't usually walk on two legs, they often walk on all fours when on the ground. Bigfoot is purported to walk on two legs
Comment icon #20 Posted by KevinP 7 years ago
Obviously you never saw the movies Clint Eastwood did with the orang.
Comment icon #21 Posted by Night Walker 7 years ago
Henry James McCooey straddled the emerging divide between bush-naturalists and academia. Self-taught and sometimes considered to be somewhat eccentric, McCooey assisted in demonstrating that echidnas were egg-laying mammals, discovered a several species of lizard - Lygosoma maccooeyi named after himself, and contributed many specimens to the Australian Museum yet is only remembered today for his supposed Yowie sighting... Earliest mention of McCooey in the newspaper archives is 17 Aug, 1877 - as a horse-dealer who went bankrupt. A year later (24 Aug, 1878) McCooey is charged and acquitted of o... [More]
Comment icon #22 Posted by Big Dada 7 years ago
This kind of reminds me of this story from Canada:
Comment icon #23 Posted by KevinP 7 years ago
I have to admit the skull is interesting, the rest of the video is just bad. Can someone please explain to me why anyone who makes a video like this always turns the background music up so loud that it is impossible to actually hear the person doing the narration? I swear I only got about half of what the guy was saying and turning up the volume only makes it impossible to understand at a higher decibel level. Edit to add: By the way, I saw on the list of videos on the right one where a female turkey hunter is supposed to have captured two Bigfoots hunter/carrying a deer. I swear it looked lik... [More]
Comment icon #24 Posted by freetoroam 7 years ago
Why does every Sasquatch and other wood-people types have to be 8 feet or taller? Don't you think there are babies, juvies, teenagers, sub-adults, and even dwarfism among Sasquatch sightings? Here come the depunkers from every corner discounting everything : [ so you think there are families of bigfoots out there?
Comment icon #25 Posted by Ozfactor 7 years ago
I can't think of any known Australian animal that fits the deion of the 5 foot hairy beast . There are 2 Aboriginal beliefs I know of that fit the deion . The Yowie and the Bunyip . The Yowie is similar to the Big Foot and the Bunyip live in water . Henry James McCooey straddled the emerging divide between bush-naturalists and academia. Self-taught and sometimes considered to be somewhat eccentric, McCooey assisted in demonstrating that echidnas were egg-laying mammals, discovered a several species of lizard - Lygosoma maccooeyi named after himself, and contributed many specimens to the Austra... [More]
Comment icon #26 Posted by Sir Wearer of Hats 7 years ago
There's also Quinkin for the dangerous and hairy beasties.
Comment icon #27 Posted by KevinP 7 years ago
I can't think of any known Australian animal that fits the deion of the 5 foot hairy beast . There are 2 Aboriginal beliefs I know of that fit the deion . The Yowie and the Bunyip . The Yowie is similar to the Big Foot and the Bunyip live in water . How awfully cruel , imprisoning someone for attempted suicide ! Yeah, mental illness wasn't a thing they could do much about, and depression or Melancholy, as it was once called was completely misunderstood.
Comment icon #28 Posted by Night Walker 7 years ago
I can't think of any known Australian animal that fits the deion of the 5 foot hairy beast . A regular person fits the deion: McCooey sought out an "intelligent blackfellow at Bateman's Bay" in regards to the "ape". Aboriginal shaman/sorcerers are known as "Clever men", have an assortment of ritualistic costumes, and are skilled at illusion... Professor Henry Reynolds (lecturer in Aboriginal history and Australian history at the University of Tasmania): Aborigines of course resisted Europeans violently by killing Europeans and by attacking their property, and often by stealing their possession... [More]


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